gleaning

Continuous Improvement The good news is that gleaning organizations are managing to convert the goodwill of farmers and volunteer
Food waste doesn't just come from your plate or the back corners of your refrigerator. Food waste starts at the farm- whether
One in six Americans struggles with food insecurity. Yes, we said Americans. Yet 40 percent of all food goes to waste. While a good part of that percentage is derived from people throwing out half-eaten grub, another significant chunk of waste is generated far before a meal reaches a diner's plate.
For example, they make juices from fruits and use hummus containers as Tupperware. Turkey meatballs, organic Greek yogurt
On this particular winter Wednesday, 26 labeled boxes containing 554 pounds of apples, citrus, salad greens, kale, squash, garlic, turnips, cucumbers and radishes have been collected by friendly volunteers wearing hats and aprons that say "Food Forward."
Gleaning. The word may not be immediately recognizable to many, and that’s probably because it hasn’t been a practice of
Picking corn, I mulled it all over. How sorely disconnected we are from our food from where it comes from, how it's grown, who grows it, even how to cook it to who gets access to it.
In order to make way for bad yields, bad weather, and unexpected disasters, (or just to make sure they have enough to satisfy their customers), most farms will end up with more than they can sell.
Helena David is on a mission. Her ambitious goal to pick and donate 100,000 pieces of fruit in one year for Southern California's underprivileged is already well underway.
Farmers estimate up to 20 percent of the food harvested in fields across this nation cannot be sold in the grocery store and is thrown out simply for aesthetic reasons.