global-education

This October at the IMF-World Bank Annual Meeting in Lima, Peru, the development community came together and discussed the newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals.
This year marks a decade and a half since the international community committed to address the vast and complex problem of educating all of the world's primary school-aged children. It's a time to reassess the next steps in the global education movement.
As education becomes dematerialized, demonetized and democratized, every man, woman and child on the planet will be able to reap the benefits of knowledge. We're rapidly heading toward a world of education abundance.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgChanging social norms is hard work, but changing age-old attitudes and behaviors in poor, remote areas is particularly difficult. While we are inspired by Malala and her dad, many in rural Pakistan still find the idea of empowering girls to be dangerous and repugnant.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgGirls enabled to grow up to reach their full potential have the power to change the world for the better. Investing in girls and building their protective assets is one of the best investments we can make for a safer, more sustainable and peaceful world.
2013-01-18-TEDplayvideo.jpgForget about the biology of it for second (that was mom's job), my dad never let on that he thought there was a difference in when I could speak, how I could learn, what choices I should have or what I should be allowed to achieve and contribute with my life. My dad never questioned that I would grow up to be his equal, to be the equal of my brothers. To my dad, my value as an equal to boys and men was a basic truth.
She has been accused of everything from being a 'western pawn' to her father's puppet, entirely undeserving of her international recognition. Yet, when she walks into the Oxford Union, she is met with an adoration usually reserved for a pop sensation, not a political activist.
When others seem certain that misunderstanding and hate will prevail, we must answer back by affirming our likeness, our goodness, and our courage.
Want to know how much McDonald's charges for Big Macs in more than 40 different countries? No problem. But want to know where children are allowed to work in mines, with poisonous chemicals, or through the night? Good luck! We decided to take steps to begin to fill these gaps.
As my three daughters sharpen pencils, don their backpacks, and head back to school, it pains me to remember that far too many primary school aged children -- an estimated 67 million worldwide -- will never enroll in school.
At the turn of the millennium, the world came together to promise that by 2015, every child would complete a full course of primary schooling. Progress is stalling.