Global Fund

Solar power offers a compelling trifecta for the world's health sector: it improves health services when electricity is otherwise
The Replenishment launch for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) was a success -- in funding and more.
And yet, the integration of treatment for co-morbidities is weak across much of the continent. Very few health facilities
Last weekend, I joined world leaders gathered in Canada as governments and the private sector came together to pledge more
PrEP, for example, has already been approved for use in the United States, Canada, France and Israel and has recently been
Gates Notes Malaria's footprint on the globe is shrinking. The Global Fund partnership and U.S. government leadership have
Mosquito-borne parasites know no borders, as the Zika virus in Latin America has reminded us this year. While the impact of Zika is still being assessed, we know that malaria kills hundreds of thousands of people a year, most of them young children. Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease, and we are determined to end it.
Innovation comes in many forms, from brilliant technology breakthroughs in Silicon Valley to less flashy advances like a simpler way to deliver essential products. In many cases, even a low-tech innovation can improve health care in a life-changing way. All you need is a new perspective on an old problem.
Of course, we cannot prevent the emergence of another Ebola-like virus. But we can prepare for it. This is not only the right thing to do, it also makes the best financial sense.
There is nothing wrong with having HIV. I tell people that I love myself and that I am not less because of HIV. And as an HIV advocate, I help other women living with HIV deal with the disease, and make sure they know that it is not the end of the world.
Five bucks helps provide a month's worth of lifesaving medication.
Mosquitoes and the malaria parasite do not respect borders. Despite tremendous progress in halving malaria deaths in the last decade, this preventable and treatable disease kills approximately 450,000 people a year.
Every dollar in the 2016 replenishment will count in the Global Fund's efforts to create a healthy environment, which in turn will serve as a building block for so many other improvements to our society.
It might surprise you to learn that every year there are 1.5 million women living with HIV giving birth around the world. While every mom is different, we all share one thing: We want our babies to be given the healthy start in life they deserve.
Information continues to surface showing that John Parsons, the former Inspector General at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, was terminated in 2012 because he was uncovering too much corruption in the organization's grants.
Just recently, Martin O'Malley, the third Inspector General in three years at the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, announced he would step down in December, cutting short a six-year commitment to the quasi-private, intergovernmental organization based in Geneva.
The problem here -- the loophole the Congress left open and the State Department drove its certification process through -- is secrecy.
In 2010, the United Nations announced that an AIDS-free generation was achievable if we focused on the most disadvantaged communities.