global-maternal-health

A future without malaria belongs to those who can dream about it, but more important, to those who create the future they want to see.
On Mother's Day, these women are celebrating mothers around the world who understand the challenges their fellow mothers face and work tirelessly on their behalf to ensure they stay alive, healthy and able to care for their children.
Maternal health in Kenya needs vast improvement. Each day, 15 women and 290 children die as a result of pregnancy complications, giving birth, HIV and other curable and preventable childhood diseases.
Necessity dictated that I learn rapidly, so I was taught by an operating assistant. Using a small generator to provide light and suction, ether for anesthesia and nursing aids, I was able to carry out many life-saving C- sections, often in the dead of night.
While their circumstances are all very different, one theme has been present in every country I've visited -- the undeniable role nurses play in maintaining the health and well-being of their communities.
When a mother survives, her children thrive. They are more likely to be vaccinated, eat properly, attend school and become productive members of their community, thereby making countries more secure and our world a better place.
Audrey is a mother of two young boys. She's 32 and works in a government department. Our lives have a lot in common -- family, work, friends. But in Tanzania, where she lives, being a mother comes with a whole different set of problems.