global middle class

In my last post, I discussed the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and why they matter. In this post, I want to focus more on how the agenda applies to the USA.
In September 2015, the United Nations achieved international agreement for its 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development. The
The period from the fall of the Berlin Wall to today is characterized by the rebalancing of the relative income positions of Asia and the West and the emergence of the "global middle class."
People who are middle income, globally speaking, live on $10.01-20 a day.
Anecdotal evidence from the last decade suggests that U.S. officials need to consider the multiple ways in which the rising global middle class is fueling radical politics.
Dealing with resource scarcity will compel companies to adopt new technologies, new manufacturing processes, and new management practices -- all of which will drive innovation faster and faster. As the global middle class expands, there will be massive opportunities for entrepreneurs to create more efficient industries and more productive business ecosystems. Technologies and industries will collide in new and unexpected ways, and these entrepreneurial mashups, inspired in part by scarcity, will potentially produce greater utility and prosperity for society at large.