Global South

Developing countries listened to experts, locked down and prevented thousands of deaths. Why doesn’t the West want to admit it?
There are several reasons why people in East Timor, like the publics of many developing nations adored "Comrade Fidel" and
Many in power in developing economies still cling to the fallacy that progress is only possible by using fossil fuels, rather than taking the opportunity to leapfrog the mistakes of the Global North.
While we see visionary and consecrated people serving well through the inherited forms, we can also see their limits.
Over the past two decades, support by USAID and other Western donors has led to an explosion in the number of think tanks in developing countries. However, much of this money is still being given and taken behind closed doors, threatening to hurt rather than help the world's poor.
Investment in infrastructure projects are more than just a bright spot for the global south. It may actually encourage investment in real assets that would boost output back in the old "rich" countries -- a welcome monsoon rain amidst a sea of paper.
As more countries have attained middle-income status, inequality has soared. The wealthiest individuals have become wealthier while growth-with-equity remains a distant prospect.
As Lynne Peeples' article in the Huffington Post shows, the tragic story of leaded paint is not over. In this latest installment, the good guys are nine organizations with shares in PPG Industries that are trying to do the right thing.
How refreshing it was to be in the presence of leaders of faith -- heads of these huge churches that represent millions -- who are more interested in the needs of the poor and the call of Christ than in being "conformed to this world" and its shallow interests or reducing gospel concerns to a few hot-button social and sexual issues.
One of the most valuable results of mapping informal settlements is highlighting that many self-built houses in the settlements are just as old as the city's first skyscrapers.