Global South

"The revolution didn't just happen 57 years ago - it is defended and fought for every day by all of us, but especially by
Many in power in developing economies still cling to the fallacy that progress is only possible by using fossil fuels, rather than taking the opportunity to leapfrog the mistakes of the Global North.
While we see visionary and consecrated people serving well through the inherited forms, we can also see their limits.
Over the past two decades, support by USAID and other Western donors has led to an explosion in the number of think tanks in developing countries. However, much of this money is still being given and taken behind closed doors, threatening to hurt rather than help the world's poor.
Investment in infrastructure projects are more than just a bright spot for the global south. It may actually encourage investment in real assets that would boost output back in the old "rich" countries -- a welcome monsoon rain amidst a sea of paper.
As more countries have attained middle-income status, inequality has soared. The wealthiest individuals have become wealthier while growth-with-equity remains a distant prospect.
As Lynne Peeples' article in the Huffington Post shows, the tragic story of leaded paint is not over. In this latest installment, the good guys are nine organizations with shares in PPG Industries that are trying to do the right thing.
How refreshing it was to be in the presence of leaders of faith -- heads of these huge churches that represent millions -- who are more interested in the needs of the poor and the call of Christ than in being "conformed to this world" and its shallow interests or reducing gospel concerns to a few hot-button social and sexual issues.
One of the most valuable results of mapping informal settlements is highlighting that many self-built houses in the settlements are just as old as the city's first skyscrapers.
Girls raised in Mumbai's brothels deal not only with challenging living conditions but also with physical, mental, and sexual violence. Several NGOs provide education and skills training to the children to try to break the cycle of prostitution, but few have their sights set beyond traditional work.
It can be very deceptive. In the digital age, we feel inundated with news and information, and so it feels like we have more access to global news than ever before. As Caroline explains, that's actually not the case.
Across the Global North, online banking solidifies its dominance and apps like Venmo simplify mobile payments. In the Global South, people with little money to their name struggle to open bank accounts, get loans, and make payments.
While the goals of neighborhood revitalization are generally positive, if a government fails to actively incorporate policies that guarantee affordable housing and public spaces, revitalization becomes a euphemism for gentrification and exclusion of the poor.
Initiatives from Nairobi, Jakarta, Dhaka, and Mumbai provide solutions to issues ranging from discrimination against refugees to lack of access to sanitation. These solutions raise awareness and provide much-needed services for vulnerable communities.
"Green Is Good," T.D. Max's story mostly about The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in the May 12 New Yorker, starts out covering TNC's current strategy to partner with big polluters to get them to mitigate in the interest of their own bottom lines.
Failure to recognize the reality of climate change can be due to one's views on the Bible and faith. Others believe that it is not the role of the church to address climate change, feeling that it is not religion's job to engage political issues.
The urban poor are often stereotyped, viewed merely as a problem to be solved -- or ignored. Initiatives across the Global South are thus exploring ways of telling the story of poverty in an inclusive and realistic way.
Marginalized communities are often situated in slum areas that lack access to proper transportation, Internet coverage and other necessary services that would allow them to become included citizens.
We are left with a paradox: Either we accept some kind of "balkanization" of policy -- wherein every society has the capacity to influence code through its own policies -- or we accept that the only way to move forward is through decisions made by international agreements.
Rapid economic and population growth has created extreme solid waste accumulation, overwhelming cities' ability to deal with sustainable waste management. The following approaches describe four solutions.