go red for women

Fighting heart disease is our mission every month at the American Heart Association. Yet February provides a higher platform
Fortunately, Donna got the treatment she needed and is alive to share these stories. I appreciate her willingness to let me use these details because they paint a powerful cautionary tale.
Although it is summer and days are longer, time remains a precious commodity. Even on the laziest afternoons, time seems to run out faster than a cool jug of lemonade at a picnic.
The future health and health care of Latinos and other Americans will be in good hands. Listening to comments and questions from young Latinos attending a recent panel discussion on "The State of Hispanic Health in America," I was encouraged and inspired.
Regardless of sector, race, or age, we all want the same things for our families and ourselves: as my mother says, "health, happiness, safety, the strength to cope with anything that comes our way." Here are six practices that help me get a little closer to whole heart health.
Candace Cameron Bure, Gail Simmons and Serayah The GO RED FOR WOMEN DRESS COLLECTION 2016 held its annual show during Fashion
But the numbness lasted for four days and wouldn't subside. I knew I had to listen to the advice I had given: Take action when experiencing symptoms. I was shocked when the doctors diagnosed my fourth stroke.
We all know that heart disease is one of the top health threats facing men. But many of us forget that this killer doesn't discriminate between genders.
The fight can't end there, because heart disease will not stop, until we stop it. We must do more than simply wear red. We must make individual changes and be a champion for change in others.
Overall, heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women. Hispanic and African-American women who focus on seven health factors can improve their overall cardiovascular health and reduce their chances of heart disease and stroke. Going to the doctor for a well-woman visit is a great place to start.
Growing up in Los Angeles, I never enjoyed physical activity as a child. I got tired quickly and always seemed out of breath. I figured it was because I was "chubby." Actually, it was because my heart was struggling with a rare congenital heart defect.
R&B singer Monica was just 18 years old and already a star. The diagnosis: a heart condition called mitral valve prolapse. In simple terms, the flap between the upper and lower chambers of her heart wasn't closing properly.
Dana's story is far too common. Although heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S. -- claiming more lives each year than all forms of cancer combined -- many fail to recognize the warning signs, which can be different from those felt by men.
Here is her amazing story, the tale of a young, healthy woman whose heart fell apart so drastically that she needed a new one... and got it, giving her a second chance at life and igniting a passion for helping others.
Her new friends will learn about the heart condition that began slowing her at age 7. How it nearly killed her one night when she was 13. How her quality of life might've been ruined that same night if not for her mom dusting off the CPR training she received as a teen.
"I saw the judges' jaws drop in their seats," she said. "They were like, `This girl already won a title and she just had open-heart surgery?!'"
As a fellow Palm Beach resident, Sally knows Michelle's story, and is amazed by her recovery. She's never met her, though
Last year on Mother's Day, I contacted one of your colleagues by leaving a message with an answering service that I had bad
Add a quick jog around the block, a bowl of oatmeal or a square of dark chocolate, and something you love to do, and you've taken a major leap towards a healthier heart. You've reduced your risk in a big way. Have a little faith in the goodness and power of your own life, and then get out there and live it.
Throughout February, in communities across the country, millions of supporters have been coming together, wearing red, and reinforcing the critical message that we can overcome heart disease and stroke.