golden dawn

As news of the guilty verdicts broke, cheers and celebrations erupted among the crowd of at least 20,000 people gathered outside the Athens courthouse.
Matthew Heimbach, head of the Traditionalist Worker Party, has been called "the next David Duke."
A study of 13 European countries found that supporters of populist radical right parties were relatively non-religious. With the exception of Poland, higher levels of Christian religiosity were weakly or negatively associated with voting for the populist radical right.
In a world where marketing and messaging has moved online, we cannot afford extremist groups the legitimacy and recruitment possibilities attached to a formal web address. When what lies behind these digital storefronts are violent extremist groups, we have a responsibility to stand up and say no.
Examining the results of Greece's September 20 parliamentary elections, we observe the worrying phenomenon that the biggest winner was abstention. In record number, almost one in two registered voters decided not to cast a ballot for any of the parties.
For the country, the triumph of Alexis Tsipras is the optimum scenario. The people have given him a clear mandate to remain within Europe and to honor the new memorandum even though they will be subject to even bigger austerity and taxes.
Sunday's snap election was unnecessary because after the defection of Syriza's left-wing faction, a new majority could have been put together out of the existing parliament without calling for fresh elections.
ATHENS ― Golden Dawn, Greece’s extremist far-right party, appeared on the political scene almost 30 years ago, but has thrived
BRISTOL -- Populism appeals to the "will of people" but is actually profoundly undemocratic. Democracy is about the negotiation of competing interests and the balancing of different values. Populism, in contrast, is a kind of mob rule. Where there is complexity, it offers simple solutions. Instead of seeking common ground, it looks to exaggerate the differences between them and us.
European leaders are finally beginning to reveal the true nature of the ongoing debt dispute, and the answer is not pleasant: it is about power and democracy much more than money and economics.