Goma

The Congolese Health Ministry confirmed a case in Goma, a city home to more than 2 million. The country's Ebola outbreak is the second deadliest in history.
An estimated 40 percent of child soldiers around the world are girls, many of whom face discrimination and struggle to reintegrate
One of the highlights of Orpheus Island is getting there. The half-hour helicopter ride from the beach town of Townsville soars over countless tiny islands surrounding the Great Barrier Reef and massive swaths of water that gives the impression that the world is as vast and endless as portrayed in an old-timey exploration novel.
This is a very good film that could have been a great film if the producers could have taken some more risks. Having navigated this part of Virunga in 2007, 2008 and 2009, I can say that taking risks is easier said then done. If the government does not approve of your footage, it is confiscated.
Trying to tell the stories of the latest human catastrophes in the Democratic Republic of Congo feels like woolgathering. Not the popular definition of a "flight of fancy," or Patti Smith's phantom woolgatherers clothed in "strange archaic cap and dress," in her magnificent story/poem Woolgathering.
As we remember the Rwandan genocide of 20 years ago, my hope is that we will look next door to the Democratic Republic of Congo and the everyday emergency that is bringing a people to its knees.
Following a year of fighting and negotiation between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the M23 rebel group, last month the M23 announced it was ending its military campaign in Eastern Congo, without a formal agreement.
2013-09-23-EntChallenge.jpgI was born 27 years ago in Goma, a town notorious for violent outbreaks. Instability exposed the darkest side of my beautiful Democratic Republic of Congo.
Discontent and violence is everywhere in Congo, but the narrative is extremely complicated, the demands and the names of militias require spreadsheets to understand, and no reporters want to venture deep into rebel territories to investigate the unrest.
After years of campaigning to bring the arms trade under control, we sometimes forget who we are fighting for. The negotiations get technical and it all gets a bit tedious. But we must never forget why we're doing this.
Bosco Ntaganda, one of the most wanted war criminals in the world, unexpectedly has surrendered to the U.S. Embassy in Rwanda and asked to be sent to The Hague to face trial at the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity.
More than one million people are at risk of militia, rebel and army attacks as fighters begin to position themselves in and around the provincial city of Goma with little or no protection from the government or UN peacekeepers.
Long-term stability will not be brought to the region until decisive political action is taken. The Congolese government needs to recognize this fact and work to foster regional cooperation.
If the war in Congo accelerates again, resulting in still more deaths added to the five million dead so far, the responsibility will fall on those who fail to act now, just as they had failed to act in 1994 to stop the genocide in Rwanda.
Rwanda, which U.N. experts accuse of giving orders to the Tutsi-dominated rebels and supplying arms and recruits, has twice
This is the first time since 2004, at the height of Congo's conflict, that rebels have occupied the city of Goma. A week has gone by, but the U.S. media and government have barely acknowledged this escalating crisis.
I felt that helpless feeling wash over me. I felt the weight of an ocean and miles of separation. Before I looked at a screen, I did something I haven't done for a while. I slipped out of my bed and got down on my knees.
Where was the condemnation from DOS when MONUSCO (UN in Congo) issued a separate press release revealing that 264 civilians