gone girl

To Alice Bolin, pop culture's anti-heroes reveal the unsayable: “It is scarier for a man to be accused than to be killed.”
Watching a film, binge watching on a tv series, reading a book. We love a great plot line, but it’s the characters we invest
13 Books on How to Not Be a Terrible Person   Straight Off the Shelf: 11 Hands-Down Favorites from a Bestselling Mystery
10--Beat By Beat Features a Screenwriter-Friendly Movie Structure Once in a while a book comes along that shakes up the world
I'm not really a film critic. When it comes to book to movie adaptations, though, I suddenly become the one person everyone wants (or doesn't want) to go to the theater with. That's because I will laugh, I will cry, and I will critique.
Kate Moretti's latest thriller, The Vanishing Year, marks a new transition for the New York Times bestselling author. With this novel, she is moving from a digital/print on demand publisher to a traditional publisher. This process represents one that so many independent and self-publishers dream about -- cracking into the work of traditional publishing.
Our absolute favorite part of Gillian Flynn's novel Gone Girl is when Amy Dunne rails against the concept of the Cool Girl
Created and hosted by ArcLight's Executive Vice President Gretchen McCourt, the Women In Entertainment Summit will feature keynotes by Academy Award winner Geena Davis, founder of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, and Women In Film President Cathy Schulman.
Karin Slaughter's first book, Blindsighted, became an international success published in 30 languages, and made the Crime Writer's Association's Dagger Award shortlist for "Best Thriller Debut" of 2001.
You blazed through Gone Girl. You ran out and bought Sharp Objects and Dark Places and read them in two sleepless nights. Now your sleepless nights are spent yearning for another Gillian Flynn book.
Mary Kubica, author of The Good Girl and the newly released Pretty Baby, takes readers through suspenseful twists and turns after a chance meeting between two women on a train platform. Fans of Gillian Flynn's Gone Girl will appreciate this interesting take on the thin line that separates sanity and darker impulses
Over the last few years, I've been writing fiction. For decades, I've been a psychiatrist. As a novelist, I now write with a reader's sensibility, and read with a writer's eye. I'm struck by the degree to which fiction and psychology share certain crucial elements.
The public's obsession with not just missing girls but pretty, palatable missing girls is a through-line in Flynn's work. A female victim is immeasurably more sympathetic if she's adorable.
Suspenseful scenes hold our attention -- and stick in our minds.