Gordon Brown

Evidence is growing of their alleged responsibility for an airstrike that killed dozens of civilians, mostly children, in the Syrian village of Haas.
ISTANBUL -- The Syrian refugee crisis has exposed the hypocrisy of a world that promises universal rights and then does little to guarantee them. Today, despite headline-grabbing pledging conferences, the majority of Syria's 6 million impacted and displaced children still go without a basic education.
What do you do after you brought your party's control of government to a dramatic end? You become an international scold and blowhard, blaming the world's problems on everyone else--who have no ability to solve any of them.
LONDON -- Humanitarian aid rests on the belief that a crisis is a short-term event lasting days, weeks or months, not years. From Syria to Sudan, history says otherwise. Faced with life on the streets, children impacted by a crisis need more than the basics for survival. They need to be able to secure skills for the times ahead. And they need hope. An education -- the prospect of being able to plan and prepare for the future -- is most likely to secure this hope.
It would help deal with issues related to child labor, slavery and marriage, former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said.
Two years on, and their parents still wake up each morning not knowing whether their daughters are alive or dead, married or single or violated as slaves. They surely deserve more than a forlorn hope. The girls are now a symbol of our apparent weakness to protect young lives.
To address the Syrian refugee crisis, the roll out of double-shift schools has rapidly become part of the education landscape. The target is now set for 1 million children to go back in the next school year, and there is no reason why this should not happen.
LONDON -- Humanity is everybody's business, and an education is everybody's right. So it shouldn't fall only to governments and international agencies to provide aid during a crisis. Inside the humanitarian tent we need charities, philanthropists, businesses and social enterprises all working together.
LONDON -- We can only ever achieve universal education for girls and boys at primary and secondary levels if we first bridge the gap in humanitarian aid for education in emergencies. Out of tragedy and chaos some good may come.
More than 30 million children in conflict areas aren't in school.
Technology will have an enormously positive impact on education progress in developing countries. Teacher training, curriculum
Europe will need to do far more to provide for asylum seekers within our borders. But while Europe copes with tens of thousands, Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey urgently need more aid to cope with millions.
Young people these days are fired up, with good reason. They are passionate, and they can and will bring change in a world that, we can only hope, they may understand even better than we do.
LONDON -- The cries of a starving or distressed child are a harrowing enough sound. The screams of a child caught up in violent conflict are an altogether different matter.
It's not something that just afflicts people of one color or ethnicity. It's striking families who never imagined that they could find themselves telling their kids that they don't have any food or that the electricity has been shut off.