Gore Vidal

In one of the final scenes of this 90-minute retrospective, Vidal suggests the debates have failed to offer the kind of analysis
Unless he was simply jealous. Because Lawrence reached artistic heights Vidal couldn't even approach. Lawrence is one of
Topher Payne sets Perfect Arrangement, directed by Michael Barakiva at the Duke, in 1950 Washington, D. C. when Commie baiting and routing out supposed deviants of any stripe were becoming federal government obsessions.
While the documentary shows Kramer in robust health and, later in life, as a frail senior citizen, it teaches viewers what can happen when one fiercely intelligent man (who is not willing to take "no" for an answer) speaks truth to power.
Citizens who have been numbed into a narcotized trance by fake infotainment media, a media controlled mostly by corporations whose bottom-lines would be hurt by a critically thinking electorate, are not the kind of citizens capable of preserving our democracy.
I have been full of anticipation for this essential biography of one of the most colorful men of letters of the second half of the twentieth century: Vidal lived the kind of explosive, interconnected, indispensable literary life--without which the shape of American letters would have been different--that feels altogether extinct now.
What William F. Buckley and Gore Vidal did for discourse in America was unprecedented. They proved there was a time not so long ago we relished hearing both sides of political arguments. And there is a time -- call it the present -- when a hunger for authenticity seems to be driving both parties in unexpected directions.
Early reviews of "Best of enemies" miss the hidden-in-plain-sight point of this documentary on the infamous, mesmerizing television 1968 TV debates between Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley.
I've been saying its like a forest fire of redwoods. If the redwoods were burning, that's them (Buckley and Vidal). And what networks took away was the flame. And that it's devolved into flash paper. Not even any ash. No content, just the explosion.
Stevan Riley's achievement in making a biopic about a great subject, Marlon Brando, who, despite having died in 2004, nevertheless comes fully alive in his own voice. Brando's life was complicated.