Gore Vidal

They were hired by ABC News, which was a distant third in the TV news game and quite frankly was groping around for anything
A writer friend recently recommended that I read Jay Parini's new Vidal biography just as I'd finished reading a review essay
Topher Payne sets Perfect Arrangement, directed by Michael Barakiva at the Duke, in 1950 Washington, D. C. when Commie baiting and routing out supposed deviants of any stripe were becoming federal government obsessions.
While the documentary shows Kramer in robust health and, later in life, as a frail senior citizen, it teaches viewers what can happen when one fiercely intelligent man (who is not willing to take "no" for an answer) speaks truth to power.
Citizens who have been numbed into a narcotized trance by fake infotainment media, a media controlled mostly by corporations whose bottom-lines would be hurt by a critically thinking electorate, are not the kind of citizens capable of preserving our democracy.
I have been full of anticipation for this essential biography of one of the most colorful men of letters of the second half of the twentieth century: Vidal lived the kind of explosive, interconnected, indispensable literary life--without which the shape of American letters would have been different--that feels altogether extinct now.
What William F. Buckley and Gore Vidal did for discourse in America was unprecedented. They proved there was a time not so long ago we relished hearing both sides of political arguments. And there is a time -- call it the present -- when a hunger for authenticity seems to be driving both parties in unexpected directions.
Early reviews of "Best of enemies" miss the hidden-in-plain-sight point of this documentary on the infamous, mesmerizing television 1968 TV debates between Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley.
I've been saying its like a forest fire of redwoods. If the redwoods were burning, that's them (Buckley and Vidal). And what networks took away was the flame. And that it's devolved into flash paper. Not even any ash. No content, just the explosion.
Stevan Riley's achievement in making a biopic about a great subject, Marlon Brando, who, despite having died in 2004, nevertheless comes fully alive in his own voice. Brando's life was complicated.
Sara Paretsky is the award-winning author of the V. I. Warshawski detective novels. In 1982, when Sara wrote Indemnity Only, she revolutionized the mystery novel by creating a hard-boiled woman investigator.
Half the struggle in documentary filmmaking is finding the right material. The other half is figuring out what to do with
"Best of Enemies" is an extraordinarily timely, provocative, powerful, poignant and important film. But its overarching themes are so subtle that the film is not about what you think it is about and you will not comprehend its magnitude until the final sixty seconds and closing credits.
The first of three documentaries in the Hamptons International Film Festival's Summerdocs series hosted by Alec Baldwin, Best of Enemies was sure to be a hit with the East Hampton crowd.
Once upon a time, network television news was dignified, objective, and delivered in stentorian, voice-of-God tones by white, vaguely Protestant men, in half-hour increments at the dinner hour.
Last week I was able to view a handful of the 81 films from 25 countries, at the five-day long AFI Docs festival that attracted filmmakers, national policy and opinion leaders, journalists and a large crowd of viewers to the 13th annual running of the event in the Washington DC area.
The realization that two such brilliant minds -- the brightest of their generation -- could allow personal hatred and the burning desire to win at all costs completely derail any semblance of useful debate is the real heartbreak of Best of Enemies.
Other than with Sunset Boulevard, who needs flashbacks? Anyway, these ineptly constructed scenes were possibly added afterwards when it was realized test audiences had no idea what they were viewing.
In an age when a coinage such as "frenemies" has meaning, the operative word in the title of a new documentary, Best of Enemies, is the word "best." The film is about a particular historic event of verbal jousting between two very well-matched public intellectuals, the "best" practitioners of the English language of their time.
“Nurturing younger writers takes more time, but there’s a commitment to doing that,” vanden Heuvel says. Even President Barack