Government budget

Recently, I interviewed Ms. Susan Singer, a 30-year veteran New York City teacher currently, a kindergarten teacher in Queens and the UFT Chapter Leader in her school.
A new military reform bill would provide an excellent opportunity for our elected legislators to ponder their own responsibility for the growing mound of waste we cannot afford.
True, the CRomnibus, the nickname of the bill to fund the federal government through next September, runs to over 1,600 pages. But I suspect most readers will associate the "m" word with massive amounts of government spending, and that's just plain wrong.
Perhaps this is the dawn of a new political narrative. The current fault lines don't get us anywhere, with Tea Party conservatives attacking the very idea of government, and liberals defending the virtuous aims of government without coming to grips with their pervasive semi-failures.
Many state and local governments are struggling to meet their obligations to retirees, and the easiest explanation is that workers are overpaid and their pensions are unaffordable. But the evidence suggests that the pensions crisis is both less pervasive and more complex than that.
It's not over -- they still have to appropriate their new top-line spending numbers down to all the agencies -- but it looks like the budget deal that quite handily cleared both chambers will soon be enacted. But I've got a few lingering thoughts
"After careful review of the agreement, I believe it will do disproportionate harm to our military retirees," Sen. Lindsey
Republicans may not have succeeded in defunding the nations' newest social insurance program, Obamacare, but they now are aiming at the foundational programs, Social Security and Medicare. And this time, they'll have the president on their side.
We just escaped another Perils of Pauline moment by deciding not to test the proposition that default doesn't matter, and the Republican Party's (apparently diminishing) instincts for self-preservation finally overcame its fear of its far-right base. So where are we?
Today's free-market fundamentalists insist that the forces of the market could easily solve all of our nation's woes if only government would get out of the way. The history of the free market system between October 1929 and the steady deflationary slide into the Great Depression three years later teaches us something different.