grand bargain

Donald Trump all but declared war (once again) on the media this week, after they actually did their jobs and investigated whether Trump had made good on his claims of donating millions to veterans' charities.
Even the whiff of openness to cutting the program is a vulnerability in key Senate primaries.
For the last three months, we've all been watching the Kabuki drama play out, but the ultimate outcome was never really much in doubt. Like a badly-written detective drama where the audience spots the killer in the opening act, almost everyone knew the Tea Partiers were going to lose this battle.
So while Republicans have spent the last few months putting lipstick on the pig that is their legislative priorities, it is important for voters to remember that the softened positions these individuals are taking now don't represent a true Republican agenda.
[Would you like to follow me on Twitter? Because why not?] The big takeaway, however, is that chasing the affections of the
American deficit hawks gathered in the nation's capital on Wednesday to commiserate over the collapse of the U.S. austerity movement, solemnly hobnobbing with political royalty to reminisce about the days when slashing Social Security seemed all but inevitable.
This policy shadow-boxing -- emphasizing the deficit while pursuing a separate agenda -- is illuminated by the fact that