gray wolf

The Lassen Pack is now up to at least seven, according to state wildlife officials.
The only thing standing in the way of the GOP-backed measure becoming law is Donald Trump's signature.
Prior to 2011 there had been no gray wolves in California since the last one was killed in 1924.
Alaska Rep. Don Young linked the U.S. homeless population to the wolf population in an outburst Thursday before the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee. After it became national news, with headlines quoting him as saying wolves would get rid of homeless people, he released a statement saying people may have "misunderstood my comments."
By Courtney Sherwood Gray wolves, native to Oregon but wiped out in the state by an eradication campaign in the early 20th
Information gleaned from the radio collar shows the wolf killed in Utah was a 3-year-old female that was captured and collared
What's wrong with Idaho? The state demanded from the federal government the opportunity to manage wolves within their borders and they are now completely blowing it. Instead of continued recovery, what we're seeing is no less than a war on wolves.
The Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell, must look at the new scientific evidence that the Northeast Wolf Coalition has put forth and do her best to preserve and protect the gray wolf. The reality is that the wolf population in the Northeast has been completely eradicated.
Wolves are being persecuted in Idaho with the same kind of repulsive attitude that nearly drove them to extinction 100 years ago. Only now it's happening under the official state flag.
As many as three separate ballot proposals dealing with the plight of the wolves will be fighting for the attention of Michigan
We must allow the recovery of wolves to continue under the Endangered Species Act; the job is far from done. Bringing back wolves restores predator-prey interactions that preceded humans and shaped the wild special places that we all love today.
What is perhaps most disquieting about the photograph is the vigilante feel that echoes a lynch mob -- dehumanize, vilify, and murder. Wolves are now reviled and persecuted in a land where they once roamed wild and free prior to European colonization.
When the Act is allowed to do its job, it's amazingly successful: 99 percent of the species under its care have been spared extinction (think: grizzly bears, gray whales and bald eagles) and hundreds are on the road to recovery.
There are roughly 6,000 gray wolves in the continental U.S., according to the Fish and Wildlife Service. About 8,000 to 11,000
Over the past year, we've seen an about-face in the treatment and management of wolves in the Northern Rockies. They've gone from being federally protected under the Endangered Species Act to being public enemy number one across much of the region. And it's about to get even worse.
Wolves in Idaho deserve better. After being nearly wiped out of the West, it's taken a national effort to return these incredible predators to the landscape.
Nearly 60 wolves have moved into Oregon and Washington in recent years. And, in late December, one of those wolves made its way into northern California -- sparking new hopes that wolves may eventually recolonize some of their historic habitat in the Golden State.
Everyone has something to say about something these days, on blogs, Twitter and Facebook. All fine and dandy. But there's another way to get heard: by putting your two cents on the record through what's known as the public comment period.