greatest generation

The 21st century has ushered in an era of unlimited and instant communication. Everyone's opinion can reach around the world. The internet does not discriminate -- it passes on the same content to thousands of different audiences but often with a variety of interpretations.
In this seven-part contribution to the #TalkToMe conversations happening, I reflect on life lessons which go all the way back to my early childhood in New York City during the Great Depression.
Pew concluded: "Fully 79% of those born between 1946 and 1964, the widely used age range of this generation, identify as
Now, I am not too much of a sci-fi geek. I don't speak Klingon, never watched Battlestar Galactica in any of its iterations, and by the third Alien movie I started rooting for the slobbery beast with too sets of teeth: anything to get Sigourney Weaver to stop scowling. Star Wars is different.
Animated interview with WWII vet Thomas E. Anderson. (With Subtitles)
We need a green energy moon shot and a bold national mobilization on the scale of World War II. Morality is crying out for us to heed what Pope Francis calls "the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor" by becoming the next Greatest Generation.
Mother's Day is here and it's my first one without Mom. My mother, Evelyn Levine, died on April 19, and it was a huge personal loss as well as the end of an era. She was the last of the Greatest Generation in her family. More importantly, she was an amazing mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, as well as my biggest fan.
I hope it's okay to go a bit older than people in their 40s and 50s. I'm a family sociologist at Cornell, and we surveyed over 1200 people over 60 on this very topic (described in the book 30 Lessons for Living: Tried and True Advice from the Wisest Americans). Here are four "life lessons" they wanted to pass down to younger people - hope you find them helpful!
Magdaleno (Leno) Díaz passed way on February 10, 2015, at the age of 95. His passing gave me pause to contemplate the significance and impact of what is often referred to as The Greatest Generation.
The attacks were devastating. America and Americans paid a much too heavy price. In all, 21 ships, including eight battleships, were sunk or damaged. In addition 188 aircraft were destroyed and 159 damaged. However, a much worse tragedy was the loss of life on that Sunday morning in Hawaii.
Our society is at least four times as rich as it was when my dad came home from the war. Far too much of that national wealth is going to the wrong people -- bankers and speculators who not only don't earn their wealth but who caused a great recession for everyone else. My dad didn't go to college; he was the first member of his family to own a house thanks to the GI bill (no housing scandals of that era -- these were direct government loans), and he was part of a rising, hard-working middle class. My kids and grandkids didn't suffer the Great Depression, nor did they have to slog across Normandy or serve time in a German POW camp. But they face a stunted future. My father's generation did not make their sacrifices only so that their great-grandchildren would be the stunted generation.
I remember walking the beaches of Normandy a few years ago, a side trip during one of my training sessions for the CIA. It was late winter. The air was brisk and damp.
We can certainly learn some of the characteristics, defining moments and values of each generation, but that's no substitute for taking the time to getting to know the characteristics, defining moments and values of the actual individual people themselves.
Shaped like my father by the American mythos that the past is something best left behind, I fled home as fast and as quickly as I could. But as Dickens so well knew, family ghosts have a way of haunting the present.
Waller's conclusion was emphatic, "Unless and until he can be renauralized into his native land, the veteran is a threat
If our celebrities who profit the most from America are unwilling to defend it the way Stewart and Williams did, perhaps that's not just a sign of societal rot. Perhaps it's a sign that our wars are simply not vital to us. And if that's the case, shouldn't we end them?
Outrageous. And all for what? Because a small faction of snot-nosed kids within the Republican Party cannot accept the outcomes of the 2008 and 2012 elections and the passage of the Affordable Care Act.
Last month, I had the privilege of hearing a man named C.C. Collie at a Memorial Day celebration in Dallas. Mr. Collie is a nonagenarian who spent WWII on a U.S. Navy destroyer during the final bloody year of the Pacific campaign.