greece debt talks

Cooperative governments that came about in the last years have been a product of necessity, political arithmetic, not of conviction to better government and consent to a nation-wide understanding so as to get through the evident national dead ends, to end national decay.
To be sure, any austerity plan imposed on the country will not be successful if it does not also embrace a complementary option that is manifestly available to provide hope to ordinary people in Greece whose mounting distress is real and must be taken into account.
Now that a cycle has run its course and it feels like a whole century has passed since the Sunday of the referendum, I dare ask the sacrilegious question: What would have possibly happened had we voted "YES"?
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — The bailout of Greece cleared some further key hurdles Friday after German lawmakers overwhelmingly
A strategically deficient fixation on revolutionary rhetoric and the simultaneous belief in a new universal "autonomy" of the state was defeated in the face of a reality that requires modern analytical and problem-solving tools as well as a new theory for the future.
Beyond the words, the citations from Sophocles, the proliferation of more or less discounted symbols, what really counted were the faces, the expressions, the bodies of the European representatives.
Hon. Mr. Alexis Tsipras Prime Minister of Greece: I warmly congratulate you for your brilliant political victory, details
And Jean-Luc Laurent, chairman of the Citizen and Republican Movement, said it was necessary to "take into account the impossibility
The Greeks have defied fear. But how will the European governments deal with their own fears? Specifically, how will they react to the possible light-speed contagion of Syriza's rebelliousness in Spain, Portugal and Italy?
The referendum, before being conducted, unfortunately released the darkest aspects and features of Greek political socialization. It reinstated divisive reasoning in the public sphere, divided society into two camps with no diffusion and without any room for common ground.
It is no longer wise, therefore, for the European Union, a superpower currently in limbo, with recessionist circumstances prevailing, to continue tormenting the Greek people in its strategic southern periphery instead of offering to us all a real chance to spark off prosperity both in Greece and the rest of Europe.
In the wake of the referendum announcement, the National Front hopes to capitalize on the Greek example as it already has on the future British referendum so that it can promote its own strategy for the euro and a European Union exit.
What will happen next? The unemployed face years of suffering. There will be more European summits, and more commitments that nobody will fulfill. The Greek problem may be fixed in the short run, but at the expense of a long-term solution.
It is true that in a referendum, the people speak. But they don't say much. Just a "yes" or a "no." That's why the important part of a referendum isn't the answer. It's the question.
A default would not necessarily lead to Athens leaving the 19-nation single currency area, but is expected to pave the way
As the Greek government and its creditors continue negotiations over the country's debt, the lack of liquidity has turned the financial situation for many of the nation's companies increasingly dire and frozen both the private sector and the domestic market.
More on the Greek debt talks: - The Economic Crisis In Greece –- As Told By An Athens Taxi Driver - Why Greece Is Not Leaving
PARIS -- Europe's demands -- ostensibly aimed at ensuring that Greece can service its foreign debt -- are petulant, naive and fundamentally self-destructive. In rejecting them, the Greeks are not playing games; they are trying to stay alive. The Greek government is right to have drawn the line. It has a responsibility to its citizens. The real choice, after all, lies not with Greece, but with Europe.
ATHENS -- The IMF and Greece's other creditors have assumed that massive fiscal contraction has only a temporary effect on economic activity, employment and taxes, and that slashing wages, pensions and public jobs has a magical effect on growth. This has proved false. Indeed, Greece's post-2010 adjustment led to economic disaster -- and the IMF's worst predictive failure ever.