Greek austerity

The IMF is objecting to a plan that has the support of Greece’s business community and the European Commission.
CORFU, Greece -- The opportunity now is to leverage German overreach against itself, like in judo, to flip the agenda of building Europe's future toward a broader approach beyond sovereign debt and the euro.
True statesmanship is finding the courage and having the intelligence to be wise without experiencing tragedy -- to see the big picture, to acknowledge the right of the other side, to craft space for compromise. Can Eurozone leaders live up to that challenge?
BRUSSELS -- The feeling of belonging to Europe might make the difference. It might lead a majority of Greeks to accept another austerity program, and prevent Greece from repeating Argentina's tragedy.
Amid fears of a Grexit, European stocks and bonds experienced their greatest volatility since January. By the end of trading
ATHENS -- Our government cannot -- and will not -- accept a cure that has proven itself over five long years to be worse than the disease.
"We would walk these elections," he told The Huffington Post in an interview Thursday. "If we held elections, we would absolutely
The multiple admonishments between Athens and its increasingly hardline partners in Europe in recent days are out of place -- even as part of a high-stakes game testing contrasting approaches to dealing with Greece's bulging debt.
The Greek economy is going to grow next year because of a significant policy reversal. The fiscal tightening is basically coming to an end. Why is this so important? Because the people who supported the policy of the last four years will, when the Greek economy begins to recover, claim that the "austerity worked." But even the IMF's own analysis refutes this claim.
One of the immigrants involved in the protests told Greek Skai TV that they had been promised wages of 22 euros ($28.70) a