greek bailout

And it appears President Obama will visit Greece on November 15 and 16. He might want to skip Greece's annual "I hate America
Greece finally passed its long awaited package of reforms, which follows the usual pattern. The Parliament was all too happy to raise taxes and social security contributions, but pension reform and the sale of NPLs is much less clear.
While EU leaders celebrate a new deal, Greece's citizens ready for yet another round of cuts.
There was no settlement between the EU and Greece before Greek Easter as promised. I wonder how many more times that headline will appear.
It's not just about the will of the majority, said Yanis Varoufakis.
Let us not use the Constitution and its revision as an alibi for political power to conceal its inability to tackle a political problem on political terms. And it is sad to see constitutional changes being used as a firework.
While debt relief would be very welcome by the Greeks, it does not have priority when compared to the need for structural reforms and for a well functioning business environment.
Each New Year seems to bring about a renewed optimism (unfortunately that optimism has already disappeared on Wall Street). Even I am beginning 2016 with the Greece glass half full. The weather is beautiful.
To understand what is going on in Greece, imagine Bernie Sanders fighting to pass a significant reduction in social security payments in the U.S. in order to continue to prop up a host of insolvent banks.
If Greece continues to refuse to deal with the NPL problem, it is only a matter of time before the Europeans simply cut the Greeks off completely.
Let us take a look at some of the numbers. The European Central Bank ("ECB") published a report, "Aggregate Report on the
Greek citizens of all persuasions turned out to vote in the country's second election of the year.
How it can be demanded to prepay taxes on income that has not materialized, and especially in an environment of economic depression which makes this materialization questionable and the demand by itself contributes further to the depression?
The country's president will set a date for early elections.
The far left, who oppose the premier's promises of yet more austerity, will form a new party of their own.