greek election

The catalyst for national transformation emanates from abroad as opposed to coming from home. Considering the status quo in Greece, extending the vote to Greeks overseas is a necessary and essential step forward on a long and arduous road to recovery.
Alexis Tsipras is now alone, without the power of magic, he must prove that, apart from a risk-taking gambler and charismatic claimant of elections, he can also be an effective manager of a government that has 10 months to perform a miracle.
On April 23rd, 2010, Prime Minister George Papandreou issued an announcement: "It is absolutely necessary that we make a formal request to our partners to activate the support mechanism we and the other members of the EU have created together."
The way things now stand, Europe's impending "support" for Greece beginning in October merely means tolerating the same genre of defiant yet deeper cuts in public expenditure than before.
"The Eurogroup needs a clear and front-loaded commitment by Greece to ensure full implementation of key reform measures necessary
BERLIN -- Not long ago, German politicians and journalists confidently declared that the euro crisis was over; Germany and the European Union, they believed, had weathered the storm. Today, we know that this was just another mistake in an ongoing crisis that has been full of them. The latest error, as with most of the earlier ones, stemmed from wishful thinking -- and, once again, it is Greece that has broken the reverie.
If Greece does leave the euro, the financial markets will react out of fear the eurozone could break up. Yet financial markets
Greece's and Europe's long-term best interests require the kind of reform that Greek governments have failed to pursue. And neither Mr. Tsipras nor any other individual leader or single country can be expected to contribute to such a policy shift without quick, clear and strong EU and social alliances.
Supporters of Alexis Tsipras, leader of Greece's Syriza party, attend his pre-election speech at Omonia Square in Athens
Syriza's call for a "European debt conference" to renegotiate the current loan debt is certain to provoke policy conflict, but may also facilitate broader discussion which may, in the best case, benefit EU integration in resolving an untenable Greek debt situation.
The European Union and International Monetary Fund have warned that Greece, which has only enough cash to last for a few