greek elections

It is too complicated to explain all of the machinations, but today there are two national channels with a license, two national
There was no settlement between the EU and Greece before Greek Easter as promised. I wonder how many more times that headline will appear.
I believe that the key to Mitsotakis' win was that he has consistently expressed the people's desire for an alternative solution to today's governmental majority.
Examining the results of Greece's September 20 parliamentary elections, we observe the worrying phenomenon that the biggest winner was abstention. In record number, almost one in two registered voters decided not to cast a ballot for any of the parties.
For the country, the triumph of Alexis Tsipras is the optimum scenario. The people have given him a clear mandate to remain within Europe and to honor the new memorandum even though they will be subject to even bigger austerity and taxes.
Alexis Tsipras is now alone, without the power of magic, he must prove that, apart from a risk-taking gambler and charismatic claimant of elections, he can also be an effective manager of a government that has 10 months to perform a miracle.
We often forget that the Greek problem is Europe's problem. The ongoing debt crisis proves this, and the chaos that the migration and refugee flows have unleashed emphasizes it.
After his humiliating capitulation in July, PM Alexis Tsipras didn't resort to merely admitting a defeat, but turned his profound U-turn into an ideology.
"In Europe today, Greece and the Greek people are synonymous with resistance and dignity."
Whatever the electoral result, one may hope that the next government will at least be able to converse with the opposition, whoever ends up being in the former or latter position.