greek system

Allowing sororities to have parties is potentially part of the solution to the epidemic of campus sexual assault.
I fear that Greek life could become obsolete in my lifetime. Excessive hazing is robbing students of an opportunity to make deep connections that last a lifetime.
The California state legislature unanimously passed a bill this month requiring universities to redefine their official definitions of consent as an "affirmative, conscious, and voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity." The bill's passing is an incredibly needed step in the right direction.
My teenage son has begun looking at colleges. Recently, while we were looking at admissions brochures over breakfast, he asked me how I'd feel if he joined a fraternity.
The history, heritage and hope that is deeply embedded in black organizational and institutional life is lost when it is assumed that racial integration is a one-way street.
We come from sentimental organizations that take pride in upholding traditions and rituals. But this is not an excuse to enable the continuation of harmful practices.
The college Greek system may be one of the healthiest forms of community in our nation, and any student who refuses to consider entering the community may be doing himself or herself a disservice.
The goals of women's rights and the furthering of the Greek system -- fraternities on campus -- remain at odds.