Gregory Peck

. The folks at Criterion have given us two superb comedies, one justly celebrated ("Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to
"Our dad loved Rome, felt at home in Rome, and it was like a homecoming every time he returned," says Anthony Peck, as he
In a sense, you could say that we once had a relationship. "Excuse me, Mrs. Helmsley," I said politely. "Your label is showing
As all the world knows by now, the characterization of Atticus has been damaged, if not destroyed, by the revelation in Ms. Lee's newly published novel, Go Set a Watchman.
Protecting the transcendent magic of To Kill A Mockingbird is now the responsibility of the middle school and high school teachers who will introduce the work to new generations of readers. I'll tap into the novel's optimism for the future and say I'm hopeful the teachers will succeed.
With disbelief and faint hope she goes on to ask, "Why must it come to us? Can't anything be done to stop it?"
In Go Set a Watchman, the novel Harper Lee wrote two years before she wrote To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus is light years from the saint of "Mockingbird." And that has readers who have cherished To Kill a Mockingbird upset. Worse, really. More like unhinged.
So, Memorial Day is over. But, some memories continue to linger. I keep thinking about an intriguing article I read in yesterday's New York Times op-ed section by T.M. Luhrmann, which asks the question, "What gives certain places their extraordinary power to move people so deeply?"
Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented.
Just yesterday, Lee's publisher announced that the beloved author's rediscovered book, Go Set a Watchman, a sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird, will be published this July.
Top Five is able to provide interesting social commentary because the core of the film is good -- it is a good romantic comedy. He has taken two of Hepburn's essential characteristics, charisma and chemistry, and put them on screen.
Filmmakers can't resist all that color or the movement of falling leaves, with deep nostalgia swiftly evoked in a few frames of swirling red and gold. Regardless of plot, cast or dialogue, the unsung hero of the autumnal movie is the cinematographer.
I've been in love with Audrey Hepburn all my life. Well, not really all my life, but at least since the moment I saw her in William Wyler's 1953 classic film, Roman Holiday. I was just a kid living in Russia, and I could only dream about traveling to Rome.
I refuse to be defined by my passport -- both literally and metaphorically. Surely there's more to an individual than his personal identification number and/or the color of his passport?
Chicago Tribune's Marja Mills joins us to discuss her book, "The Mockingbird Next Door," about her neighbor and longtime friend Harper Lee.
Collins' influence stretches beyond the festive hand tossing of Tinseltown glitter, however. Her charitable outreach -- from The National Center for Learning Disabilities to the prevention of child cruelty in the UK -- stand out.
No doubt, selecting "the best law film" is highly dependent on one's personal preferences and even the general mood of the public at the time a film is released. So let's see what Oscar has to say about the best trial films since the inception of the Academy Awards.
We've all had impossible loves. As RoboCop romped across the Valentine's weekend silver screen, I was reminded of an earlier android amour of my own. For years, I have kept his identity, like my unquenchable ardor for him, locked in my heart. He was my secret obsession, my guilty pleasure, but it's time I confessed.
By 1959 when Tennessee Williams got around to presenting Sweet Bird of Youth on Broadway, as directed by Elia Kazan and starring
According to Open Culture, Dali produced over 20 minutes of surreal footage, but only a few minutes made it through the final