Gregory Peck

The special features from Criterion include the 2003 commentary by Hiller, Falk, Arkin and Bergman; a new interview with
"He was very hands on!" according to Cecilia. "He drove us to school on his way to work, he was very involved in our school
During the Blizzard of 2016, my better half and I had plenty of hours to watch, debate, discuss and bicker about movies. We
As all the world knows by now, the characterization of Atticus has been damaged, if not destroyed, by the revelation in Ms. Lee's newly published novel, Go Set a Watchman.
Protecting the transcendent magic of To Kill A Mockingbird is now the responsibility of the middle school and high school teachers who will introduce the work to new generations of readers. I'll tap into the novel's optimism for the future and say I'm hopeful the teachers will succeed.
With disbelief and faint hope she goes on to ask, "Why must it come to us? Can't anything be done to stop it?"
In Go Set a Watchman, the novel Harper Lee wrote two years before she wrote To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus is light years from the saint of "Mockingbird." And that has readers who have cherished To Kill a Mockingbird upset. Worse, really. More like unhinged.
So, Memorial Day is over. But, some memories continue to linger. I keep thinking about an intriguing article I read in yesterday's New York Times op-ed section by T.M. Luhrmann, which asks the question, "What gives certain places their extraordinary power to move people so deeply?"
Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented.
Just yesterday, Lee's publisher announced that the beloved author's rediscovered book, Go Set a Watchman, a sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird, will be published this July.