Griswold v. Connecticut

The 86-year-old is lobbying Congress on the anniversary of a landmark Supreme Court case on contraception.
To the extent she can, Dr. Clare Scott tries to win over the hospital: Me Before You - A Life-Enhancing Presence, a Life
Fifty years ago, just five years after the FDA approved the first birth control pill, the Supreme Court struck down a Connecticut state law that prohibited the use of "any drug, medicinal article, or instrument for the purpose of preventing conception," thereby making birth control legal nationwide for married couples.
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the legalization of contraception in the U.S., and the release of a Mad Max sequel with a woman in the hero role. What do these things have in common?
By the end of June, the U. S. Supreme Court will deliver its decisions regarding same-sex marriage and, as well, the healthcare law whose controversial provisions include some contraception and abortion coverage.
For those birthing presidential campaigns and those conceiving runs for legislative power and those lusting for criminal court judgeships, The Cider House Rules and Griswold v. Connecticut should be required reading.
Less than a century ago, in 1920, Tennessee lawmakers ratified the 19th Amendment that allowed American women the right to vote in federal elections. The current drive by Republicans and corporate allies to uproot safeguards for privacy and women's rights undermines that legacy.
Basically, women's reproductive freedoms challenge male domination economically, socially, and religiously, and therefore, what can be more political?
WASHINGTON -- The landmark 1965 Supreme Court decision in Griswold v. Connecticut, which prevents states from criminalizing
This election year, we will decide, in dramatic fashion, the degree of access Americans, particularly the most vulnerable, will have to family planning.
If women's right to use contraception is to mean anything at all -- if their individual right to make their own health decisions based on their own religious and ethical beliefs is to be a reality -- those rights must be protected by law from the interference of their employers.
As a female member of a younger generation, it is not only discouraging, but frightening, to see what's happening across the nation. I hope to grow up in a society that recognizes and upholds the reproductive rights of women.
If the next president is a Republican who gets to replace the ailing Ruth Bader Ginsburg with a judicial conservative, the right to privacy could be a thing of the past and states could enact laws which would pass Constitutional muster restricting access to birth control.
On the 35th anniversary of a decision that should have guaranteed women's human rights to make childbearing decisions without legislators and preachers weighing in, I and all women are becoming nameless and faceless Roes.