grit

Parents shouldn't hide their hard work from their children.
Resilience - failure happens but gritty people know how to recover from failure and become stronger. Kaplan Thaler and Koval
These days, a lot of people have been talking about grit. What it is, why it's good, and how to get it. The news is filled with stories of personal achievement driven by sheer determination and the will to win. Angela Duckworth's Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance argues that grit is often a more effective attribute in achieving goals than talent or IQ.
At the same time, true grit--persistence and passion--is clearly something we want both for our kids and for ourselves. Fortunately, the life-skills that make us gritty can be learned and practiced.
Heroes, stories and imagery may have inspired humans to overcome insurmountable obstacles but for me, it was the Lamborghini
Developing resiliency is like riding a bike: difficult to master, but impossible to forget.
If you're a parent and self-reflect at all, you've undoubtedly wondered whether you're a good parent. Perhaps you've wondered whether you're the best kind of parent.
Clearly the idea that grit is one of the keys to success has grabbed our curiosity. After all as Angela herself writes in the book after asking three hundred American adults to tell her how they felt about their grit scores: "In the entire sample, there wasn't a single person, who upon reflection, aspired to be less gritty."
If the U.S. were a grittier place, would voters have permitted Social Security and Medicare to rack up $50 trillion in debt that will be paid by their children and grandchildren?
After 20 years in a corporate and government career, I traded in security and income for entrepreneurship. I recently left my Federal job to become a small business owner offering leadership/career coaching, training, and consulting. And oh, what a trip it has been.