grit

Parents shouldn't hide their hard work from their children.
Resilience - failure happens but gritty people know how to recover from failure and become stronger. Kaplan Thaler and Koval
These days, a lot of people have been talking about grit. What it is, why it's good, and how to get it. The news is filled with stories of personal achievement driven by sheer determination and the will to win. Angela Duckworth's Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance argues that grit is often a more effective attribute in achieving goals than talent or IQ.
At the same time, true grit--persistence and passion--is clearly something we want both for our kids and for ourselves. Fortunately, the life-skills that make us gritty can be learned and practiced.
In summary, the passion and persistence of grit motivates and carries us over rough seas like a well-made surfboard. We can think of an absence of effort like a crack in our surfboard that needs repair.
Heroes, stories and imagery may have inspired humans to overcome insurmountable obstacles but for me, it was the Lamborghini
Developing resiliency is like riding a bike: difficult to master, but impossible to forget.
If you're a parent and self-reflect at all, you've undoubtedly wondered whether you're a good parent. Perhaps you've wondered whether you're the best kind of parent.