gross domestic product

GDP is not a synonym for progress. Just look at the blistering inequality around the world.
Can happiness predict political upheaval more accurately than traditional economic measures?
Let's go back 4 years to the WEF in 2013, Christine Lagarde, Head of the International Monetary Fund, warned us all that
Nine years after the Great Recession began during the tax- and regulation-slashing Bush administration, some startlingly good economic news arrived from Washington, D.C., last week.
The SDGs and the Paris climate agreement are clearly interconnected and any effort to tackle one without immediate consideration of the other will do serious disservice to both.
As President Obama prepares to deliver his final State of the Union address on January 12, it's difficult to remember how incredibly bad the economy was when he took office seven years ago and how important financial reform is to getting the economy working again for all Americans.
Growth has lifted humanity from the caves to the cities and given us civilization. Yet today it is scapegoated by its critics for causing many societal ills. Growth's critics rightfully sound the alarm on environmental and social problems. But their criticism of growth misses the real issues of poor policy and misguided public values.
"You really shouldn't have an economy with over $50,000 in GDP per person and have lots of people living in poverty who are willing to work."
Whatever the motivations, Dirk Philipsen points out, "thinking about life as volume of economic output" has become an article of faith in the modern world. And Gross Domestic Product is the universally accepted measure of the state of every nation's economy.
If we compare Black child well-being in America to child well-being in other nations, the U.S. Black infant mortality rate exceeds that in 65 nations including Cuba, Malaysia, and Ukraine. Our incidence of low-birth weight Black infants is higher than in 127 other nations.
This is something that Germany, instigator of the eurozone's austerity policies, has to learn if it wants to bring Europe out of its Second Great Depression; by supporting policies that will unite Europe into a greater union, rather than cause its disintegration.
Recently released mortgage disclosure data findings indicate that a majority of future U.S. households could face significant challenges in achieving homeownership.
Small is compact and constricted, always seen in comparison to big. The current global scenario demands an existence of both in equal forms. Small maybe frowned upon in terms of size, but it is the reason why big exists.
The outlier was services -- such as gym memberships or daycare -- which increased 0.9 percent, down from 1.3 percent in the
In other words, the U.S. government has been a drag on the economy for the past three years, which was not coincidentally
Real GDP contracted at a 2.9 percent rate according to revised data released on Wednesday. That's contracted, as in went down. So, are we back in recession?
Lost in the constant and unending stream of national headlines last week was a troubling bit of economic news that could negatively impact each and every one of us.