gujarat

The court sentenced 12 other people to seven years in jail for their role in the Gujarat riots that left 69 Muslims dead.
The Modi dream is fading. An Economist report found him widely described as an "authoritarian" and a "megalomaniac" even by supporters. More important, by all accounts, he does not believe in a liberal free market. Rather, like so many Republican politicians who routinely applaud free enterprise, he is more pro-business than pro-market.
India has extraordinary potential. Modi recently acknowledged that "there are huge global expectations for India." But for decades the Indian government has squandered its future.
From a destination-quality point of view, Gujarat strikes me as pure India, still unadulterated by international tourism. The people are friendly, the streets filthy, the culture deep and complex, the traffic crazy, the dances fun, prices affordable, and the weather hot.
Our society has become so adept at creating Chitras -- filling their minds with fears and insecurities making them under confident, so afraid about what might life have in store for them lest they take the less trodden path. Any semblance of courage left to break out is snubbed so strong that it forgets its own existence.
Attacks like these are not new in Pakistan. In the past, militant outfits, both sectarian and ethnic separatists, have carried
NEW DELHI -- The government's honeymoon is perhaps already over and realistically it has another six to 12 months to start putting flesh on the bare-bone schemes and ideas announced this past year. If these do not eventuate, one may well witness emptier stadiums abroad and hear shriller voices at home. Ultimately, for PM Modi to sell the Incredible India story, he will need to make India credible.
Following decades of detrimental overseas coal project financing by MDB, there has been meaningful progress made to secure new policies at MDBs to limit this type of financing. But despite this progress, there are some entrenched interests that refuse to get with the times.
Over decades of international gift-giving I've gathered a few pointers which might put more ho than humbug into your holidays if internationals are on your list. My motto is, "Be generous, but appropriate." Here's how...
One person who seems to have been demoted from his perch atop political gods is Jawaharlal Nehru, India's first Prime Minister.
As Cyclone Nilofar, a category 4 super cyclone heads towards the north-eastern coast of the Arabian Sea, Karachiites with their adventure-thrill loving practices, make way towards the extremely popular Karachi beach-front, commonly known as Sea View.
No doubt the Obama administration feels overwhelmed. Who has time for India? But make time President Obama must. India matters today. It will matter much more tomorrow, especially if Prime Minister Modi commits his political capital to eliminate barriers to entrepreneurship, investment and growth.
Without economic prosperity and the lifting of the lower and middle classes, no amount of social justice will enable India to compete in the global marketplace; or its citizens, including minorities, to thrive and advance. Narendra Modi, having come from a humble background, understands this fact well.
In the four months since taking over as Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi has moved forward on at least five initiatives that would have been unlikely under any previous leader.
There will be photo ops, gifts, and recitations about the leader of the world's largest democracy sitting with the leader of the world's oldest. But substantive matters are also to be discussed: Business. Weapons deals. Counterterrorism. Human rights and regional security issues will also be on the table.
Hopefully, Mr. Modi will recognize that the fragile nature he holds in temporary custody is a product of millions of years of evolutionary Karma. Grandmother Nature gave birth to Mother India, which he has sworn to serve.
Could this be the beginning of a new India? A lot can go wrong in months to come, but the first steps of a Modi administration are nothing short of remarkable.
India, where business is conducted in English, has more in common with the United States than any other major economy in Asia. The potential for mutual benefit for these two free market democracies is unprecedented.
One thing is certain: by this time next month, India will have a new prime minister. What happens from there is anybody's guess.