gun industry

The Equal Access to Justice for Victims of Gun Violence Act would end special legal protections for firearm manufacturers, sellers and trade groups.
Few still doubt that today's NRA is nothing less than a trade association for the firearms industry. But for those who do, a recent report distributed at its "Annual Meeting of Members" last week offers the latest confirmation of this growing organizational and financial relationship.
The fact is that the use of guns in self-defense in America bears little resemblance to the false claims made by the NRA and its gun industry partners. Perhaps most striking is that in a nation of more than 300 million guns, how rarely firearms are used in self-defense.
I am not sure if I can adequately convey the degree to which this final footage is simply beyond anything that exists when it comes to capturing the extreme violence associated with guns.
As household gun ownership in the United States steadily declines, the firearms industry and gun lobby are targeting children as young as grade-school age as the next generation of customers.
"Much like the tobacco industry’s search for replacement smokers, the gun industry is seeking replacement shooters."
Illinois is home to several major gun manufacturers, including Springfield Armory of Geneseo, which is one of the largest
I have no doubt that some additional legislation, such as background checks, will help stem the tide of this endless gun violence. But the real answer is in repealing existing legislation -- the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act.
The leading medical organizations plus the American Bar Association believe that "deaths and injuries related to firearms constitute a major public health problem in the United States." This consensus is not going to change because some judge thinks that doctors should avoid the issue of guns.
The dominance of semiautomatic pistols has greatly increased the firepower in civilian hands. Not only are semiautomatic pistols capable of rapid fire, they utilize high-capacity ammunition magazines and can be quickly reloaded. The combination of these features makes semiautomatic pistols efficient killing machines.
A clear majority -- two thirds -- of Americans don't have guns in their homes. Almost four out of five Americans don't personally own a gun. And as the gun-owning population continues to age and die off, fewer Americans are taking their place. These numbers terrify the NRA and their "corporate partners" in the gun industry but should offer hope for the majority of Americans.
Until recently, the pro-gun gallery has owned the issue of gun safety, which they mostly define as keeping guns out of the 'wrong' hands, i.e., crooks, creeps and other undesirables who want access to guns for no other reason than to inflict harm.
What's interesting about the new attention to safety being paid by the gun industry is that the notion that guns might be potentially dangerous no matter how they are used is a concept that is remarkably absent.
The gun industry knew this new breed of assault pistol could trigger restrictions on specific types of ammunition that are considered armor-piercing when used in a handgun, but it moved ahead anyway, driven by the need to create new, militarized market categories in the face of declining household gun ownership. Now they are attempting to rewrite history.
You know that something's up in the gun business when Rush Limbaugh starts talking about gun control. And what he was talking about this past week was the decision by the ATF to create a new standard for exempting certain kinds of so-called 'armor-piercing' bullets from the ban that Congress placed on such ammo in 1986.
The real reason that the gunnies want to push physicians out of the discussion about gun violence is because the NRA and its allies want to disconnect gun ownership from violence to make their products more acceptable, more enjoyable, more normal for every dad and mom.
Since 2005, gun industry "corporate partners," as the NRA likes to call them, have donated between $19.3 million and $60.2 million to the NRA. This partnership will be on full display at the annual meeting -- which itself is sponsored by firearm accessories vendor MidwayUSA.