gun safety laws

Hillary Clinton has elevated the "Charleston loophole" to national prominence. But efforts to close it face an uphill battle.
Even without California's "bullet button loophole," high-powered rifles would have been easy to buy in neighboring states.
Here's a question for you: Which causes more deaths, motor vehicle traffic accidents or firearms? I asked a bunch of people that question, including a bunch of doctors, and everyone said that motor vehicles did.
While there are troubling undertones of racial suspicion and fear in Trayvon Martin's killing which must be addressed as justice is sought, the fact is that most Black young people murdered by guns are killed by Black shooters -- just as most White children and teens murdered by guns are killed by White shooters. Sadly the tragedies of Tucson, Aurora, Newtown and elsewhere made clear that none of us are safe anywhere or immune to the pervasive threat of gun violence. We are all in the same boat and must act together to stop the plague of violence. Gun safety laws that only apply in one city or state can't fully stop our national epidemic of gun proliferation and violence any better than we can stop a flu epidemic by vaccinating one family.
If Americans had said no more after Columbine, there may never have been a Virginia Tech. If we had said no more after Aurora, there may never have been a Newtown, and maybe some of the more than 31,000 other American gun deaths that occur each year could have been prevented.
Although the U.S. accounts for less than 5 percent of the global population, Americans own an estimated 35 to 50 percent of all civilian-owned guns in the world. We can free our nation of this scourge of gun violence.
"If someone wants to purchase deadly ammunition, they should have to come face-to-face with the seller,” Lautenberg said