H5N1

For much of the United States, winter means cold weather, snow, sleet and friendly reminders to get flu shots. Indeed, vaccinations
The country's last outbreak was in 2007.
A new study led by East-West Center researchers and funded by the National Science Foundation has confirmed suspicions that "peri-urban" areas at the outer fringes of cities are particular hot spots for the emergence of animal-to-human infectious diseases.
The United States should take the lead in starting discussions toward an international agreement requiring the strictest oversight and highest biosafety level for research on other potentially highly contagious and lethal pathogens.
How and where will the new bird flu fly? Will it grow or be contained? History offers different outcomes, yet we do know for certain that zoonotic diseases will continue to emerge.
With 10 cases of the new H7N9 bird flu confirmed in people in China since Sunday, including four deaths, Beijing is mobilizing
In spite of our current low risk, it is just a matter of time before H5N1, H7N3 or another influenza strain evolves into a dangerous form that results in a pandemic. And the events in Mexico and Cambodia beg the question: Are we ever going to be safe from bird flu?
(Additional reporting by Sharon Begley in New York and Julie Steenhuysen in Chicago; editing by Andrew Roche and Todd Eastham
Palese suggested in a perspective article co-authored by Taia Wang and published ahead of print on January 25, 2012 in Proceedings
FUZZY LINES Yet federal funding to prevent and respond to bioterrorism is plummeting. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control