H5N1

Flu exacts a terrible annual death toll on the world's human population. Data from the National Institute of Health shows
The country's last outbreak was in 2007.
A new study led by East-West Center researchers and funded by the National Science Foundation has confirmed suspicions that "peri-urban" areas at the outer fringes of cities are particular hot spots for the emergence of animal-to-human infectious diseases.
The United States should take the lead in starting discussions toward an international agreement requiring the strictest oversight and highest biosafety level for research on other potentially highly contagious and lethal pathogens.
How and where will the new bird flu fly? Will it grow or be contained? History offers different outcomes, yet we do know for certain that zoonotic diseases will continue to emerge.
Writing in the scientific journal Nature last week, Simon Wain-Hobson, chair of the Washington-based Foundation for Vaccine
In spite of our current low risk, it is just a matter of time before H5N1, H7N3 or another influenza strain evolves into a dangerous form that results in a pandemic. And the events in Mexico and Cambodia beg the question: Are we ever going to be safe from bird flu?
The WHO said experts at the meeting included lead researchers of the two studies, scientific journals interested in publishing
Racaniello, who did his thesis research under Palese, suggested on his popular Virology Blog in early January that the estimates
However, no sooner had the realization been made than federal funding cuts began to threaten U.S. efforts to predict and
In the study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Shaman and his colleague, Marc Lipsitch
Everyone recognizes the raw power that pandemics have to sweep through human populations and seemingly kill indiscriminately. Yet, given the importance of these events, large questions remain remarkably opaque.
Some of the hardest questions in the process of scientific discovery aren't about science, but philosophy. A good illustration of this is the unanimous recommendation by the NSABB that two leading journals not publish certain details about "bird flu."
Hong Kong health workers began slaughtering more than 17,000 chickens on Wednesday after a carcass infected with bird flu
According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, the H5N1 virus has infected more than 500 people in more than