habitudes

I'm sure you've heard the phrase "think outside the box." It's become a cliché among Americans today. We must remember, however, that clichés can be true, even if they're overused.
Endorphins are released, and you feel good about the gains you've made. It provides a high, and we cling to it. It's why some competitive types will try anything -- even cheating -- to be one up on someone else.
Today, however, our memories are taking a beating. First, we are bombarded with more information than ever before (up to
If you ask the average parent or teacher about school safety these days, their reply would most likely indicate how fearful they are. It's easy to conclude school has never been a more dangerous place. I mean, it's true, isn't it?
Why have parents shifted from teaching self-reliance to becoming hovering helicopter parents who want to protect their children at all costs?
Just like great cross-cultural missionaries, shouldn't we find ways to connect with the people we're attempting to reach? Wouldn't it make sense to use the vehicles of communication they prefer?
Today, we want to discuss the behavior set, mindset and belief system of STEM leaders. We call these habitudes -- because success is a combination of disciplined habits and battle-hard attitudes.
Habits can hold amazing power in our lives. When we do something consistently enough it becomes subconscious for us to perform that routine. We don't think about it or analyze it, because it has become so ingrained in us to do it that way.
Pictures stick. We remember pictures long after words have left us. They give traction. We remember the stories in a long speech, not the words. They paint a picture.
When a college freshman received a C- on her first test, she literally had a meltdown in class. Sobbing, she texted her mother who called back, demanding to talk to the professor immediately (he, of course, declined).