haitiblog

Haiti's challenges are enormous and there are no easy answers. However, a two-pronged strategy --- registration and monitoring of NGOs and a governmental and donor focus on "core governance" -- may be a good start.
The world has focused on rebuilding Haiti after this tragedy, but it's important not to lose sight of Haiti's rich traditions. One of them is soccer.
Haiti is not just "rebuilding" with cement and muscle. Haiti is "reimagining" a nation, with a bold vision and collective dream.
Two years ago, President Obama promised the people of Haiti: "You will not be forsaken. You will not be forgotten." From what I've seen, working with those already in Haiti who have a record of getting things done is the only way the United States can fulfill that promise.
To place blame solely on the earthquake is to miss the political and historical underpinnings of poverty in Haiti.
More than simply recalling the day, it is important that we quite literally re-member -- that we reconnect and attach ourselves again to that part of the body of humanity that was severed.
We are all diminished by the reality of the situation in Haiti. Reconstruction has been painfully slow, funds promised by other nations have not yet been paid or paid in full, and many, many people still live in tents.
This notion that God caused this earthquake as a good thing for the people of Haiti is troubling theology. Where is that "good thing" in the midst of the suffering?
Anyone who has lived or worked in Haiti for any length of time is bound to be asked if Haiti is hopeless. That will certainly be the case this week, when Haitians commemorate the second anniversary of the Jan. 12, 2010 earthquake.
Hope, as theologian N.T. Wright says, "is a mode of knowing, a mode within which new things are possible, options are not shut down, new creation can happen."
I tend to enter a situation with a knee-jerk didactic mindset. The places I have been fortunate enough to travel to have reduced this response to a certain extent, but Haiti has changed it for good.
Six -- last week was six months since the earthquake devastated Haiti. Five -- this month is five years since Katrina destroyed parts of New Orleans. Ten -- next year it will be ten years since the Twin Towers were reduced to rubble.
I spent the six month anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti discussing donations, distribution and the state of Haiti at this juncture with Claudinette Jean.
Paolo Chilosi, who runs Multilink, a leading internet provider in Haiti, boldly stated that the internet is as vital as food
During my recent trip to Haiti, I stood by with my heart in my throat as I watched a nurse take away oxygen from a premature baby in order to give it to a mother in labor whose unborn child had a faltering heartbeat.
It's impossible to project what the future holds for Haiti. The optimists hope this earthquake will generate so much attention
A few weeks ago the government identified a temporary relocation site for those most vulnerable to the rain in the settlement camps. Last week people began to be relocated there. The camp now houses five thousand people.
I understood what Jeanette was saying, and I wish we could have done more; but before getting to Haiti, I didn't know if