handel

Christina Pluhar's haunting retelling of the Orpheus myth draws on a narrative of evocative, sensual Baroque music and folksongs
This week's pièce de resistance is Bach's Goldberg Variations in perhaps its best performance ever. On the MDG audiophile label. Played by the Bassoon Consort Frankfurt. Really.
This thoroughly goofy and deeply adorable enterprise is the brain child of an early music group called Ars Antiqua Austria
Both are a series of pastoral encounters in a fluid place and time, bathed in spills of color on a bare stage. Storm clouds occasionally menace, but these are resilient dancers, possessing an all-American can-do.
My experience with Spotify inspired me to re-examine my CDs with a view to a major clean up. So I looked at the impressive wall of more than 2,000 recordings and for some reason my gaze fell upon one, a box-set of an opera by Handel called Alcina.
Organist Paul Jacobs and soprano Christine Brewer come to San Francisco's Davies Hall on Sunday afternoon, October 18 to present works from their recording, Divine Redeemer, released last month on the Naxos label.
The title of this post is distinctly ideological and, I believe, holds implications for a discussion of the medicalization of madness and mental illness.
One of my first jobs after graduating music school was a production of Cosi Fan Tutte with Eugene Opera. As is typical with regional opera companies who rent performance venues, rehearsal space is always an issue.
Young tenor, Mingjie Lei, a product of the prestigious Curtis Opera Theatre, displayed the voice and confidence of the up and coming Bel-Canto tenor that he is. His tones were bright, without an edge, sort of a soothing balm to the ears.