handel's messiah

Luckily for Stutzmann, her singing career began to flourish. "I won an international competition as a singer two years later
Is there any doubt about the existence of a war on Christmas? There shouldn't be. It's been going on for years. But I don't mean the one that's been the obsession of guys like Bill O'Reilly.
Young tenor, Mingjie Lei, a product of the prestigious Curtis Opera Theatre, displayed the voice and confidence of the up and coming Bel-Canto tenor that he is. His tones were bright, without an edge, sort of a soothing balm to the ears.
I began to think of dementia as a Grinch -- descending upon our family, dimming the lights, stealing our baked goods, and taking away my mother's ability to give, which is really all she ever wanted to do.
In the Messiah the Jesus story begins with Israel's prophets. They anticipate the savior's arrival, which finds its fulfillment in the gospel stories. Israel's anticipation and Jesus as its fulfillment: that makes the story.
As we mark the anniversary of that heart-breaking event of Dec. 14, 2012, her words echo in my mind and prompt me to re-post the meditation I wrote at the time, "Light in the Darkness."
Rejoicing against Judaism is -- thank God -- neither the whole nor the primary story of Messiah; it is, however, I'm suggesting, a significant forgotten secondary aspect.
Blah blah blah, music of another old dead guy, you say? What is the point? 272 years ago a German immigrant to England, George Frideric Handel, composed his oratorio Messiah in just 24 days.
A few years back, I wrote about new discoveries surrounding the holiday classic, Handel's "Messiah." Several months later