hanna rosin

As a college admissions counselor, I see parents and students all the time who stress out about every test taken and every hour of community service served. I try to remind them to remember the bigger picture -- that nothing is worth it if a student is miserable.
He nearly destroyed this magazine. Sixteen years later, his former best friend finally confronts him. Read more on New Republic
We claim to have a heart for the poor, for changing the world to more closely reflect the divinely inspired kingdom vision offered to us by Jesus. And yet, the tools required to make the changes are right before us. It's how we're choosing to employ them that betrays the darker nature of our all-too-human hearts.
Don't you remember how you used to disappear with your friends for hours at a time? Exploring, building, hiding, playing, making up songs and dances, fighting, tossing a ball, always playing in the street, coming up with strict hierarchical kid societies, disappearing into nature?
Tiger Mom: Sh*t happens. Now spell it!!!! Mindful Parenting: I am aware that sh*t is happening.
America's obsession with safety has stunted children's development. It has made play so boring that American children spend hours on the sofa with their video games, contributing to the crisis of obesity.
Whether you derive your parenting philosophy from Seinfeld or the Buddha, it pretty much comes down to this: What can I control?
Suzanne Venker's op-ed for Fox News argues men are becoming second class citizens as a result of a biased education system, the man-bashing media, and female advancement. Could the emphasis on equalization has in fact created a male crisis?
What did you think of Suzanne Venker's article? Comment below, or join the conversation on Twitter @HuffPostWomen. Here are
We find ourselves, as a society, at one of the greatest pivot points in our nation's history. The jobs of the future -- those high-paying jobs that on balance will drive families into the middle class and beyond -- will favor women.
"And if he has a wife that out-earns him .. It's gonna put some stress on that marriage." Now we get to what's really bothering
Rosin, whose adorable 4-year-old son Gideon sat on her lap as she spoke, said guilt is only part of the dilemma for parents
Does the persistent resonance of The Bell Jar, and of Plath's life itself, represent a literary achievement, or a cultural failure?
The NCM has advanced its many causes through counseling services, helping men find family law experts, staging protests at women-only establishments and using the media to trumpet their movement.
For many years, I faithfully drank eight glasses of water a day. I was told it was good for me. I never really knew who first said that, or why. Now I find out that it's just a rough guideline from a 1945 government report; which also pointed out that we get most of the water we need from just eating food. I'm beginning to wonder if the same thing is happening in that turbulent new arena of gender handicapping: that women are rising and men are toast -- their masculine roles as fire starter and bear killer usurped by a new age of female power. Like the water rule, it's been repeated so often, we've come to accept it as fact. But also like the water rule, conventional wisdom about the decline of men ignores an important qualifier.
Really, how could any semi-enlightened male worth his Detroit auto bailout possibly wish for a vacuous one-percenter like Mitt Romney, a guy who would just as soon lay them off as sell them to China for scrap?
Where I differ with Rosin and Mundy is over their skimpy analysis of what caused all this.
Difficult economic circumstances, less-than-stellar academic performance, and growing equality for women may have all conspired to lessen men's advantage at work, but "success" in the workplace is not the only or ultimate measure of a life well-lived.
At first I thought it was just me. Then I looked around at my friends. One lost his job in his 40s. He's being supported by his wife who commutes to the city. Another friend is a writer. He sits at home while his wife goes off to work. My friend Robert was forced into early retirement when he was 57. He's the house husband; she's the breadwinner.
I completely agree with Hanna Rosin on how much—and for the most part, how irreversibly—women’s options and gender power