haqqani network

His group was known for complex, well-organized attacks on both Afghan and U.S. military as well as civilian targets and high-profile kidnappings.
The State Department said Pakistan could receive the funding if it takes decisive action against terrorism.
The longer the U.S. delays its inevitable departure, the longer chaos will reign.
Anger toward Pakistan is consistently increasing in Washington, particularly in Congress, as more new voices are speaking
Congress should approve future military action only when Washington has no alternative course to protect America--its territory, people, or constitutional liberties.
Imagine you're the U.S. ambassador to Pakistan, and you've been tasked to draft a cable to prepare American officials in Washington for the visit of General Raheel Sharif, the Pakistani army chief who has arrived in town for a five-day trip.
This trip once again highlights the army's brazenly tight grip on the country's democratic government, specifically its foreign policy.
American and Pakistani officials have discussed the elimination of terrorist safe havens in Pakistan for at least the last two decades. Why, then, has the United States failed to secure Pakistan's acquiescence to its demands?
The height of the Pakistani state's chutzpah is that it does not only harbor these terrorists for decades and unleash them on the neighbors and the world, but also that it wants to be given credit and a thank you note even when America or Allah takes them out. The fundamental question about Mullah Omar's death in Karachi is who in Pakistan knew about his presence there, when did they know it and what, if anything at all, did they do about it.
The Haqqanis have been blamed for some of the most spectacular attacks against American targets in Afghanistan.
KABUL, Oct 16 (Reuters) - Afghan forces have arrested the son of the feared Haqqani network's founder along with a militant
As the United States ramps up its 'no boots on the ground' war against jihadists in Iraq and Syria, the stream of threats emanating from the region appear to grow ever wider and deeper.
One way or another, the United States owes its service members the ride home. They may face military court, or simply return to their lives, but leaving anyone behind is not right. But questions over Bergdahl's motivations and actions are not what embarrasses Obama.
Although Pakistan's political leaders have expressed optimistic sentiments with respect to the election of the right-wing Narendra Modi as prime minister of India, let us not forget that the country's true center of power does not lie in Islamabad -- it resides in the cantonments of Rawalpindi.
As President Obama and Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif meet in Washington today, American officials have struck a positive tone ahead of their talks.
The war in Afghanistan is winding down, yet the enemy is as determined as ever to inflict mass casualties on U.S. troops.
For an unstable and fragile country like Pakistan, next month's general elections are important. But they will not necessarily resolve many of the country's outstanding problems.