harold meyerson

At a time when America is experiencing an upsurge of progressive organizing and activism -- from Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter to Bernie Sanders' campaign for president -- we need a regular columnist who can explain what's going on, why it's happening, and what it means.
With these four new trump cards on the table, the odds against fast-track get better -- and almost certainly the next Presidential election will put the candidates of both parties to the test. Trade diplomacy's House of Cards looks ever shakier -- even if it doesn't topple in the next few months.
Two of next year's Democratic presidential contenders, Gov. Martin O'Malley of my current home state of Maryland and Gov. Andrew Cuomo the state of my youth, New York, both consider themselves progressive. Neither of them, however, can be called "progressive" in the traditional sense of the world.
We need more leadership from the top, as we had when the President came out for marriage equality and lit a fire under the movement and the party.
The greatest danger currently facing all of us in America, and particularly progressives, is one of drift. As an economy, the United States is drifting along a low-growth path that is acclimatizing all of us to levels of unemployment which only a decade ago would have been treated as an outrage. As a society, the United States is drifting towards levels of income and wealth inequality so large that, if left unchallenged, will soon become irreversible. And as a political system, the United States is drifting towards a Republican sweep of both the House and the Senate in November unless the democratic left acts now to reverse what is in truth a carefully orchestrated and heavily funded great moving right show. Those of us of a progressive predisposition are drifting towards a political defeat of historic proportions -- one underpinned by an economic and social settlement of a highly conservative kind -- and we are doing so with what would appear to be only the slightest sense of alarm.
Taking a job at a multi-level marketing firm would be a tacky signpost of any first-tier politician's professional trajectory. It's especially unsightly when that politician is Antonio Villaraigosa.
The New Republic, a long-standing magazine of American liberalism, which has faced similar financial problems in recent years
How are we going to get unemployed Americans back to work? The GOP wants to lower taxes and decrease regulation because it thinks we're stifling innovation. The Dems want to spend tax dollars on infrastructure and other public works projects.
The leaders of House Mass Deportation Caucus, Reps. Smith, Gallegly, and King, are not only driving the GOP immigration strategy, they are driving their party off of a political cliff.
The election in Wisconsin is the latest example of a corrupted two-party system where neither party adequately represents the majority's will. One tramples on it, using lies and fear, and the other offers only the weakest defense.
The LA media landscape just got richer. Joe Donnelly and Laurie Ochoa have joined forces to produce the debut issue of the quarterly Slake Los Angeles.
Why is America's National Association of Manufacturers echoing the Cato Institute's views against American manufacturing? Has this organization lost its way? Do NAM members know about this?
Judging by the first public meetings on health-care reform that members of Congress have begun convening in their districts
In times past, I've had harsh words for Fox for its consistent misrepresentation of the news. Read more on Washington Post
This is a real indictment of the laissez-faire, manically neoliberal political economic order that we have had in place during the Clinton and Bush eras, and the excesses that the U.S. engaged in are staggering.
There simply is no other candidate, from either party, who has had their comments, their fragments, dissected so dishonestly the way Hillary Clinton's have been.