hashtag activism

While many still wish to denounce hashtag activism as narcissistic, lazy, and ultimately devoid of real solutions, I have to firmly disagree.
The hashtag was trending on Twitter on Saturday.
Of all of the incredible work I get to do at Glamour -- the Women of the Year Awards, putting heroes like First Lady Michelle Obama on the cover -- this is the stuff that fires me up most. Why? Because this next generation of girls has really got something.
In 2014, we saw more and more high-profile women not only defend feminism, but define what it means: The simple belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities.
“Not a lot of Americans know Muslims as friends and neighbors, so their understanding of Islam and Muslims is shaped by negative
I propose that the use of social media as an instrument for activism will follow, if not already is, the same trajectory. Social media is one of the most powerful forms of activism, and (dare I say) a catalyst for change. Here's why.
The power of social media is hard to dismiss. What once seemed like a trivial way to keep in touch with friends, sharing photos and jokes, has become a force for societal change, shining light on subjects previously unknown.
Will retweeting a post like "I believe animal abuse is wrong, RT if you agree" actually make the tweet's readers go out and volunteer at their local shelter, or get more animal rights legislation in Congress passed? Probably not.
Imagine if Twitter was around during the Civil Rights Era. Think about the greatness of hashtags such as #ihavedream or #selmatomontgomery Hashtags don't sound too unnecessary anymore, do they?
Twitter activism has had a big impact in the past. Shortly after her racism scandal broke, celebrity chef Paula Deen's #PaulasBestDishes