Hassan Nasrallah

The vote comes two days after a U.S. airstrike killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani inside Iraq, dramatically increasing regional tensions.
Unofficial results showed Hezbollah and its political allies won just over half the seats in Lebanon’s parliamentary election.
100 years on, it seems naive to continue to believe that the division of the region via the Sykes-Picot agreement is still relevant when the reality on the ground tells an entirely different story. The West must take this into account if it hopes to find a solution to a conflict by which it is now also directly concerned.
Local media pay much lower salaries, if and when they can be found, in an overall unsettled economy. Several leading dailies
Herein lies the minority trap: the greater the punishment that Hezbollah and Assad inflict on the Sunni majority, the more they expose themselves and their supporters to violent retribution, which in turn drives the minority population further into their embrace. Neither the first Vienna summit on Syria negotiations nor the second one planned for this weekend appears to address the tragedy of these two minorities -- the Lebanese Shiites and the Syrian Alawites. Without a lifeline thrown from outside powers, the bond between hijacking despots and hijacked population will almost certainly grow tighter.
"No," Assad-loyalists would rush to say when asked if the current Russian military build-up in Syria can be considered an "invasion" or indeed, a new foreign "occupation" of Arab lands.
In a new video posted online, Nusra Front militants announced the formation of a 'Jaish al-Fateh' branch in the Qalamoun region. Jaish al-Fateh (Army of Conquest) is the same rebel alliance which has scored numerous victories in recent weeks against the Assad regime in northern Syria's Idlib Province.
BEIRUT -- Amidst all this flexing of muscles, America is effectively disempowered by its stand-off policy, but also from its political investment in the war on ISIS, with its many contradictions and tensions.
The Middle East remains a powder keg with most regional actors balancing precariously upon a tightrope. The danger of a misstep that could plunge the region into a new war is ever present and unfortunately, nothing suggests that trajectory will change anytime soon.
Hezbollah's intervention in Syria has achieved significant gains. The result, however, has been that Hezbollah ("party of God" in Arabic), once widely respected by Sunnis in Syria and the region for its military struggle against Israel, is now frequently dubbed the "Party of Satan."