Hayao Miyazaki

Like Hayao Miyazaki's classic film, the park will focus on nature. It won't include rides.
We need another story from the animator who accepts darkness and nuance.
Few directors have the ability to captivate an audience like Hayao Miyazaki. Not only are the stories of his films emotionally gripping and beautifully told, they are also visually stunning.
Whether the characters are bugs, rodents, toys or on the wrong end of the shrink-ray, it's clear that big money can come from moviegoers' fascination with seeing things from an itty bitty perspective.
The Mt. Rushmorification of social discourse is destroying any semblance of nuanced, sophisticated analysis. And I'm right there with it, doing what I can to continue the trend.
If you've been going through the vast collection of films that have lapsed into the pubic domain, you've likely stumbled upon an animated feature called The Curious Adventures of Mr. Wonderbird, a strange little thing featuring voices by such luminaries as Peter Ustinov, Claire Bloom, and Denholm Elliott.
Does religion exist at all in today's art world? Yes, but most often as documentary or anthropological art about religion. It's also been said that contemporary art viewing experiences are similar to traditional religious experiences.
The Wind Rises may have lost the Oscar to Disney's Frozen, but Hayao Miyazaki and his famed Studio Ghibli animation studio aren't shedding too many tears. The studio won its own Oscar in 2003 for Spirited Away and was nominated again in 2005 for Howl's Moving Castle.
Of all the animated films that have arrived in the United States from Japan, those produced by Studio Ghibli have been the