HDP

The government's crackdown on groups with ties to "terrorism" is in response to a failed coup attempt in July.
As Turkey slouches toward dictatorship, purging enemies and former allies, Recep Tayip Erdogan has a cheering section, in the form of the AKP, the ruling party in Turkey.
As the Kurdish conflict with severe measures threatens to bury whatever remains of hopes to establish peace, indications from the HDP camp, represented as the third largest group in Turkish parliament with 59 deputies of 550 are also clear.
Beyond the internal dynamics of the Kurdish movement, the past five months have inflicted traumatic wounds and memories on Turkey's increasingly divided societies, which require a radical change of collective mentalities to heal -- something the past election certainly did not provide.
ANKARA -- The Turkish electorate knows that the AKP is corrupt, has strong authoritarian tendencies and continues to plunder (but distributes some of) Turkey's resources. But they also know that it can deliver services as it did until 2011. Above all, the voters favor stability and economic predictability. Fundamental values such as freedom of expression, freedom of assembly and free and fair elections constitute much lesser concerns.
ISTANBUL -- The Turkish president now has an opportunity to offer something new to Turkey, to the Middle East and to the world. A fresh approach is very badly needed.
What makes Turkey's authoritarianism, especially the AKP's, so hard to battle, is that it is covered with a thin layer of democracy. Elections are being held, the turnout is high, no wide range fraud was reported, four parties made it into parliament. But the campaign was all but democratic, given the government's violence, further control over the press and detention of opposition politicians.
While this picture reinforces the sense that Turkey is returning to the dark days of the 1990s, there are two reasons why the country's current predicament is also different, and much more dangerous, than it was two decades ago.
We're switching between Turkish TV channels. It's Monday evening, October 12, and in Turkey they're burying the victims from the country's worst terrorist attack in modern times. Newsanchors have tears in their eyes.
Mourners accuse the Turkish government of enabling Saturday's bombings in Ankara.
The nation is still reeling from twin bombings that killed at least 95 people on Saturday.
Turkey's offering Washington a fig leaf of cooperation against the Islamic State, but it's turning all its firepower against the most effective anti-ISIS fighters in the region -- the Kurds.
The new cabinet includes pro-Kurdish and nationalist legislators.
One of the ultimate signs of the settlement of the Kurdish issue in Turkey will be the representation of the Kurds in the political centre with their own identity and demands. This may be the harbinger of such an eventuality.
In 1997, the movie Wag the Dog told the tale of an American President who created a fictitious war against Albania to distract from domestic scandals, ensuring reelection. Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan must have seen it, as he's following the same script against the Kurds in order to boost his party's flagging fortunes. But will it work?