Health promotion

Enlightened, and emboldened, action on health in cities, is key to rescuing people from living in urban deathtraps, where
As doctors and child advocates who care for children, we want them to have the opportunity to grow up to be healthy, productive members of our society. To help them realize their potential, healthy economics may be one of the best remedies of all.
As the most visible castles on the most prominent hills of what we call, rightly or wrongly, our "health care" system, hospitals are ineluctably caught up in our notions of what both health and care should mean, and do.
By rallying to the mandate of the evidence-based, consensus-based fundamentals of health promoting, sustainable living and eating -- I believe we can accomplish something for public health and the human condition that is, quite simply -- out of this world
While I understand that drug use for some people is unwise (and best avoided) either because of their age, pre-existing health conditions or other vulnerabilities, the decision to use drugs is one that must always be treated with respect.
Over time, I drifted to spending more and more time trying to figure out how to improve the health of low-income New Yorkers and the most vulnerable among our neighbors. What I have learned over the years is that poverty and health challenges are intrinsically intertwined.
It's hard to run a city like Los Angeles. It's a town with lots of competing perspectives on everything from the best taco truck and ramen place to the role of our streets and sidewalks. Tacos and ramen though are easy. Ask people about the streets and it can get ugly.
In so doing, I have apparently invited a variety of ad-hominem-by-proxy attacks in Cyberspace directed at me, and at those
In that area, we are looking right down the barrel of a loaded gun. The most recent formal projections by the CDC indicate
It is essential to generate and communicate evidence in a way that enables decision-makers to understand the value of investing in prevention while taking into account their priorities, interests and constituencies.
The desire to fit in is a powerful shaper of behavior. In some cases, social pressures serve us well. Just think that 20 or 30 years ago, smoking in public places, drinking and driving and littering were not only commonplace, but widely accepted. Thankfully, things have changed. In other cases, social pressures are lagging behind their times, specifically at work.
Those of us hoping for health need our kids as much as they need us. In unity there is strength, after all. A family that eats well together has no junk food in the house in the first place.
For most of us, it's time to stop rolling our eyes at non-existent conspiracies, and actually attempt to eat well and be active. It means there is no scapegoat to blame for all our ills, and no silver bullet to save us.
I have clung to the conviction that truth is often immediately furtive, but relentless and ultimately indomitable. Seekers of truth are patient of necessity, obliged to be disciples of time. So far, I have kept the faith that eventually enough data would rally us to common understanding and common cause.
I genuinely believe the luminous prize of vitality -- more years of life, more life in years -- is tantalizingly, almost agonizingly within reach. But until more of us can agree we do know what, there simply is no how.
Lifestyle is the greatest of all medicine, but it may feel in this morbidigenic, obesigenic world of ours that we can't get it to go down, because we just don't have the right spoon. It may feel that we can't get there from here. That is, in a word, wrong.
High BMI and smoking remain among the top three risk factors that contribute to the highest burden of disease in Western Europe and the U.S., and the research mentioned above highlights this issue and discusses potential solutions, with implications far beyond South Africa.
Health isn't built in hospitals; disease is treated there. Health is built every day, over the course of a lifetime, in the places we work, and learn, and play, and pray, and love, and live. Or it isn't. And if it isn't, the "health care" system can't fix it.
Without the right skill set, health is elusive. You can't get there from here. The relevant skills are yours for the taking, and with them, you and those you love truly can be to an astonishing degree, disease-proof.
Integrating HIV disease management into our conversations about and strategies for addressing chronic diseases would be a public health game changer -- not only medically, but socially.