health workers

Doctors and nurses say drawing attention to urgent needs and hospital conditions is the only way to force change and save lives. But it could cost them their jobs.
A father is using his 3-D printer to create face shields to protect people against COVID-19.
It's pretty clear that at a basic level, men are just as involved in the act of conception as women are. But when it comes to who's using contraception, things aren't even close to 50-50.
Over 60 percent of those attacks were deemed intentional.
But what else has shaped global health in 2015? And what could be in store during the year to come? US announces Africa needs
Countries are catching on to the demographic dividends that come with robust family planning programs, which can help turn a low-income country into a middle-income country. In fact, for less than the cost of a cheeseburger per American per year, we could reduce the world's population growth by 500 million, saving mothers' and children's lives everywhere and helping poor countries prosper like never before. So what's the holdup? And who's being left behind?
When people become ill, sometimes they need medicine or certain supplies. Sometimes they need a hospital stay or an operation. Other times they simply need bed rest. But there's one thing that's needed by everyone, everywhere: good care.
Growing up in Senegal, I lived in what we in the global health community might call a "pronatalist" environment -- meaning that women and communities prefer large families. Contraception was, and often still is, difficult to come by, and many women die as a result of childbirth complications (289,000 per year worldwide, in fact).
Our goal is to help the Liberian government overcome the epidemic and resume strengthening the national health system so it can swiftly contain the next public health crisis.
As Dr. Rick Sacra prepared to fly to Liberia to treat patients in the Ebola zone, he prepared for the worst. He sat down