Heaven and Hell

Instead of theological sameness, I like to imagine that heaven is a place where we become even more different than we are now, just as I have found that I have become more myself the older I've gotten and I think I would say the same thing about my husband, my children, and my dearest friends.
One of the most revolutionary ideas ever conceived is that we are more than our bodies and that our true home lies beyond our physical planet. This idea, that we are or have souls that do not die at death, is found in all the earth's religions.
I love the fact that Mormon doctrine denies no one resurrection, not even the worst of murderers, and I love the idea that God is so generous and loving to His children, that He wants to grant us as much of His own estate and knowledge as He possibly can.
There are many reasons why the storyline about hell does not work for me. Not anymore, anyway. There was a time I tried to believe in it, afraid I might just end up there if I did not.
In the deepest recesses of his heart, Fred Rogers was an unabashed universalist who believed that God never gives up on any of us exactly because we are all essentially good, valuable, and lovable: God is the Great Appreciator, and we are the greatly appreciated.
It would be disingenuous of me to claim that I know for certain what happens when we die and what follows. Mediumistic communication is a slippery subject, and I am aware of its potential pitfalls. But I am also widely read in the area, and what I've tried to show here is the remarkable richness of the best of spirit literature.
The earth swallows up Korach and his followers after their rebellion and they descend into "hell." When they arrive, do they meet the devil? And is hell an actual place?
We are all going to die. Everyone knows that. Having cancer just makes it a little bit more real. I am not a religious person. I know that the majority of the world population do believe in God, heaven and hell and/or some sort of afterlife. That's ok.
We are reminded of the words of Isaiah the prophet: "For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways
But these weren't invitations from just anyone -- these were from the king. In the United States it would be like rejecting
How could an innocent baby be held accountable for the actions -- or lack of actions -- of some stupid adult? There was some mistake. Nervously I stood and I asked, "Sister, are you sure this is right? I know God wouldn't do this."
If I had to make a decision right now at this moment... Some people die young. And that's not right. But when you reach a
It is not my intent here to influence what your religious convictions are or how you should vote. My purpose is to call to
The pope made waves when he said in a sermon last week that Jesus Christ redeems all: those who are Roman Catholic and those who are not; those who believe, and those who don't.
Whatever possessed you to give nice atheists a one-way ticket to Heaven? According to Vatican Radio you said: "The Lord has redeemed all of us, all of us with the Blood of Christ: all of us, not just Catholics."
Pope Francis went farther than just acknowledging that atheists aren't going to be tortured for all eternity. He also said that if we live virtuous lives, we will be "redeemed" by Jesus just like Christians. That last part goes a little too far for me.
A thriller incorporating the work of the 14th century poet Dante Alighieri, 18th century philosopher Thomas Malthus and 21st century gene manipulation, the novel puts into perspective differences between Catholic and Jewish visions of hell, and the way our respective histories have shaped our contemporary circumstances.
People who have had a near-death experience are convinced that they had a glimpse of heaven. Although each near-death experience is unique, we find recurring messages in them. But these messages come right under the domain of religions that say they have the answers.