Help Yourself

Joseph D. Buxbaum, PhD Director, The Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Reflect on the lessons you've learned recently. Reflect on what you might want to change. Reflect on how you might bust out of your comfort zone to get there. Be imperfect. But be real. Know that's the best way to be. And know that, in the end, it will all be fine.
Figure out what you truly believe and make a choice that works for you.
Learn from the guy -- from his self-awareness, his willingness to move on, and his ability to make his life better by finding support, creating something, and learning from others. Channel the parts of Van Gogh that work for you and create an even better story for yourself because of it.
I started thinking about this during brunch this past weekend when my friend Heidi talked to me about the trials and tribulations of trying to potty-train her 3-year-old son.
When your sense of power is based on the personalty or ego, then life is tough. You are likely to meet struggle, pain and hardship. There is another option.
Adjusting to this new reality means appreciating that just because there's a crisis going on, you can't live in it all the time: in crisis mode there's nothing to do but get immobilized with dread.