Henry James

These story openers will draw you in—and leave you wanting to read more.
Jennifer Senior plucks up this quote from Wittgenstein in her review of Madeleine Thien's Do Not Say We Have Nothing (NYT
I was reading The Portrait of a Lady -- which many critics consider The Great American Novel -- at 3 AM when I came to the famous Chapter 42.
One of the most popular quotes about kindness on the Internet is attributed to the novelist Henry James: The reference in
The exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art John Singer Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends is in its final days, ending October 4th. I was fortunate to be invited to give two talks during the exhibit examining Sargent's work from an artist perspective.
The Metropolitan Museum has been hosting one of the great Sargent shows this fall; it will close on October 4, and believe me if you haven't run over to see it, do.
"Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends," currently showing at the Met, is a virtual vade mecum of l9th European culture, as seen from the perspective of the great and often quirky transatlantic portraitist. There is Ellen Terry as Lady Macbeth (1889) and a sketch of Yeats (1908).
Getting to know Newport, Rhode Island, is -- how should I put this? -- just a bit different from touring around other famous resorts. You were thinking a quick walk-through of The Breakers or another summer mansion? Think again.
And if you're a Holmes fan, this book is probably a must in the canon. Dan Simmons delivers personal details about Holmes' upbringing you may not have read before. The author details Holmes' fascination with the new wonder drug from the Bayer company. No, not aspirin.
It seems that the examples of James and Dencombe were not enough to sustain Roth, who found the anxiety of writing such a burden that he experienced enormous relief when he announced his decision to retire as a novelist.