Henry James

These story openers will draw you in—and leave you wanting to read more.
Jennifer Senior plucks up this quote from Wittgenstein in her review of Madeleine Thien's Do Not Say We Have Nothing (NYT
I was reading The Portrait of a Lady -- which many critics consider The Great American Novel -- at 3 AM when I came to the famous Chapter 42.
I've been reading James since college and The Portrait of a Lady was an experience that deepened my fiction and took it to
The exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art John Singer Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends is in its final days, ending October 4th. I was fortunate to be invited to give two talks during the exhibit examining Sargent's work from an artist perspective.
The Metropolitan Museum has been hosting one of the great Sargent shows this fall; it will close on October 4, and believe me if you haven't run over to see it, do.
"Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends," currently showing at the Met, is a virtual vade mecum of l9th European culture, as seen from the perspective of the great and often quirky transatlantic portraitist. There is Ellen Terry as Lady Macbeth (1889) and a sketch of Yeats (1908).
Getting to know Newport, Rhode Island, is -- how should I put this? -- just a bit different from touring around other famous resorts. You were thinking a quick walk-through of The Breakers or another summer mansion? Think again.
And if you're a Holmes fan, this book is probably a must in the canon. Dan Simmons delivers personal details about Holmes' upbringing you may not have read before. The author details Holmes' fascination with the new wonder drug from the Bayer company. No, not aspirin.
It seems that the examples of James and Dencombe were not enough to sustain Roth, who found the anxiety of writing such a burden that he experienced enormous relief when he announced his decision to retire as a novelist.
Louis Begley has written 11 novels, the latest, Killer, Come Hither, features Jack Dana, a Marine infantry officer who was wounded while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. He has become a writer, with his debut novel skyrocketing to bestselling status.
A section on “radical futures,” with essays from Noam Chomsky, Toni Morrison, Rebecca Solnit and David Zirin, offers proposals
Today is International Women's Day and I have to pay tribute to the amazing woman who changed my life, setting me on the road to success as a writer.
Edith Wharton is not a writer you tend to think of on Valentine's day. Her marriage was unhappy and the affair she had in her forties was with a faithless cad (it was a secret until the 1970s).
When I started out, an author friend warned me that publishing was a crazy business, and he was right. Ever since my first book was published in 1990, I've been seeing news items about one scary trend or another.
Currently, he haunts the Internet. He's constantly being quoted as saying encouraging, inspiring remarks your mother or your best friend might say to you when you're feeling miserable, or things you'd want on a thought-for-the-day calendar.
A lot of people swear by Goodreads. I swear at it. Often. It's a font of unsourced quotations, some of them fake, just like Wikiquotes. Take the line that tops the list of George Eliot quotes: "It is never too late to be what you might have been."
There is nothing quite so fine as a tried and true ghost story -- one that sends shivers down the spine while you hide under the covers.
All of these works have enriched my life, and invite rereading, and I commend them to those who have not yet experienced Ed's help in shaping their thinking and the enjoyment that inevitably comes from reading his work.