high fructose corn syrup

Will it be enough to bring families back into the restaurant?
My toddler likes "Blue Cookies" (they're fluorescent blue and likely have nothing remotely natural in them). And she prefers
We all reach for sugary drinks from time to time. Some more than others. But who can blame us? They are discretionary calories
“Some population dietary changes, such as increasing fruits and vegetables, can be challenging due to agriculture, costs
Refined Sugar Ahh, refined sugar or commonly known as white (granulated) sugar, perhaps the most deadly ingredient on this
More kids today are eating highly processed foods and drinks instead of fresh fruits, vegetables and prepared foods. Does the source of the calories matter? I used to think not. I used to think that what we are eating is fine but that we just need to eat less of it. However, I've proved myself wrong.
CREDIT: Anand Katakam/Vox H/T First We Feast Scroll down to see other ways in which the American diet has changed. A new
High fructose corn syrup has been a somewhat mysterious ingredient ever since the 1970s. It was introduced to the market
If we are going to reverse this epidemic before it is too late, we must provide children with the knowledge to make healthy choices at young ages. Otherwise, who cares if kids know arithmetic and social studies if they don't live past their 35th birthdays?
Even if you believe government has no role banning large sodas or taxing sugar, do yourself a favor -- cut sugary drinks out of your diet. It could be the difference that saves your life.
Isn't it okay to have a Reese's Peanut Butter Cup every now and again? Why is Emily Luchetti against fun? These are all questions that I'm sure you're asking yourself.
After I detoxed HFCS out of my life, I felt healthier -- like the foods I was eating were really nourishing me, instead of
Public health and nutrition dialogues need clear, explicit messages. Naturally-occurring sugars and added sugars are very different animals. The same goes for processed foods. How is it that a national nutrition organization can simply choose not to recognize that cooking a pot of oatmeal is vastly different from making a Three Musketeers bar in a processing plant?
The medical community should be in the forefront of directing patients toward better, natural foods, and, if need be, advising that any diabetic contact a certified nutritionist to help guide them away from diabetes.
Unfortunately for food companies, the Internet genie is out of the bottle and there's no turning back. So instead of commissioning studies that demonize the Internet, social media and/or "moms with food fears," food companies should take to heart the one simple lesson to be gleaned from the many recent successes in Internet food activism: Consumers want transparency.
By far, the biggest challenge I faced during my sugar challenge was the simple task of determining whether something had added sugar or not. I read labels, asked wait staff, and did online research and still was not always confident that I was eating something sugar-free.
Sugar is killing you. Or at least it is making you a lot less healthy. America's love affair with sugar has been linked to
On nutrition labels, sugar is just sugar. But when it comes to how the body metabolizes that sugar, there are two very different
Fed Up is an excellent documentary; it's the latest in shocking truths about our food in America from Atlas Films with producers Katie Couric, Laurie David, Heather Reisman, Regina Kulik Scully and Michael Walrath, directed by Stephanie Soechtig.