High Noon

When in despair with the fortune of our country, I began reading High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an
It's easy to look at history, whether recent or in previous centuries, to question a lack of action on the part of individuals and nations. It's more difficult to want to see things in the present.
On November 28, 2015, my spouse and I went to see Trumbo, which is based upon the life of Dalton Trumbo and how it was impacted during one of the most shameful times in U.S. history -- the McCarthy era. The film interested me because of many comparable similarities today and because the father of close childhood friends of mine had been included on the Hollywood-blacklist.
Movies are magical. The good ones hold you captive in a great story, to a different time and place, and then bring you back home. In two hours, they leave you changed, having learned new things and lived a different life.
This year while I waited to hear who would be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, a Nathan's hot dog sizzled in my frying pan, its spicy Coney Island smell making my mouth water as the names were announced. When it was over, I was so heartbroken I lost my appetite.
Some may like it hot, but on a recent visit to Djibouti, one of the hottest places on earth, it was sheer boredom that drove me out into the searing noonday heat. I just got fed up with sticking in the delightfully air-conditioned micro-climate of my hotel.
This past weekend, The White House hosted Pixar's filmmakers for a Father's Day screening of Monster's University. The White House movie theater has been the cinema-in-chief to Presidents for the last 70 years. If those walls could talk.
Sometimes, all you want is a knock-down, guns-blazing approximation of an old-style western, even if it's set in contemporary times. As a modern oater, The Last Stand is shamelessly entertaining.
Her ascendancy from Grace Kelly to Her Serene Highness, Princess Grace Of Monaco was the stuff of storybooks (and a newspaper editor's dream) in 1956, yet without the "happily ever after" part.
While comedies are certainly well represented on this list (reminder to Hollywood: they do lend themselves to brevity), you'll also find dramas, westerns, war films, horror and suspense. A smorgasbord!