highways

A consensus is growing that infrastructure across the country needs serious investment. Public financing is the least expensive
Activists are calling the proposed construction a "death warrant."
It's common to find yourself behind a slow driver while you're desperate to make a quick delivery. Alerting the rather slow
I drove to a national park with my husband for a nature-filled retreat this summer. The drive was long and the hour twilight. The roads were gray and shadowed, trees forming triangular apparitions on either side.
It's taken almost 60 years, but we are finally realizing the error we made when the United States built highways through the middle of its cities, displacing and isolating hundreds of thousands of residents, and we're beginning to do something about it.
For generations, this country's transportation infrastructure served as the backbone of our economic success. We dreamed big, we built bigger, and our economy flourished. But today, our crumbling infrastructure is slowing economic growth.
New legislation could help minimize the risk, but it's not enough.
My husband and I are trying to put this recent escapade in the rearview mirror because my declaration comes with a bit of embarrassment: Yesterday, I had the "winning" score of 11 miles to go in my gas tank and 8 miles to the closest station.
If history tells us anything, it's that a) we've seen this act before, b) that law enforcement will by hook or crook, get the capabilities it needs and c) it will come running to Congress for relief the next time a new technology crops up.
You know how they have those signs along roads that tell you to watch out for falling rocks? You know how you always ignore them? Well, there's a place near where I live where you really do have to watch out, and it claimed another vehicular victim recently.
State governments need to find other sources of funding to keep their highway programs whole. And many are finding tolling to be that solution. Tolling brings us closer once again to the "user pays" principle that helped create America's modern highways.
The amount of time you spend on the road is dependent on where in Illinois you live and work. Your commutes could either be drawn-out and stressful, or they could be brief and relaxing after a long day at work.
Trump taps into the righteous anger of an electorate while misdirecting those voters to scapegoat our struggling veterans, military, federal workers, retired people, sick and challenged under the clever and nondescript term -- dependent class. The American worker does not deserve to be squeezed by its own government. If politicians like Senator Casey and Hillary Clinton cannot get their message across, extremists, like Trump, win.
Congress will work on a multiyear fix when legislators return in September.