hijab

Kathy Zhu, who held the title for just one day, is now defending comments targeting black and Muslim people.
Many officials including teachers and cops won’t be able to wear hijabs, kippas or other religious symbols on the job, thanks to Quebec’s new Bill 21.
Mona Eltahawy criticizes “hijab solidarity” and suggests focusing on eradicating Islamophobia, misogyny and hatred within their own families and communities.
“No one’s commitment to our constitution should be questioned because of their faith or country of birth," the Democratic lawmaker wrote in a tweet.
The international boxing association approved new uniforms that highlight its "commitment to gender equity and religious tolerance."
Jenan Ayesh, from Oklahoma, said she was slapped and told to “go back to [her] country” last month in Dallas.
One of the first Muslim women in Congress, Ilhan Omar, is challenging a 181-year-old rule that barres religious headwear in the House chamber.
One of the first Muslim women in Congress, Ilhan Omar, is challenging a rule that barres religious headwear in the House chamber.
Sara Iftekhar is the first hijab-wearing beauty queen to appear in the Miss England pageant finals.
The Salam Sisters dolls, which have rearrangeable hijabs, are loosely inspired by real-life Muslim women.
Most people are shocked when Mona Haydar reveals she’s a rapper. "I think people don’t expect it. They sort of want to put me in a box of like oppressed Muslim woman who needs liberating by some white male savior."
Camp director Tahsiyn A. Ismaa’eel believes city officials used a vaguely worded policy to keep her students out of the pool.
Halima Aden knows immigrants can be "misunderstood" and is speaking out to make a change.
Halima Aden is only 20 years old, but she’s already on the covers of magazines as an international model. She was born in Kenya in a refugee camp, to escape the conflict in Somalia
Two converts offer their perspectives on their spiritual upbringing and how it empowered them to embrace a new faith. They speak openly about how they found their new religions and what their decisions meant for their families. (Supported by Netflix)
Austrian Muslims called the move "patronizing" -- especially since most girls don't wear hijabs until puberty.
“Muslim women don’t often get a platform to tell our stories or share the silly -- sometimes stressful -- idiosyncrasies of our day-to-day lives,” Huda Fahmy said.